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Celebrating The South West’s Global Communities

by <object object at 0x7fa9ec990580> last modified 12/04/2024 03:56 PM
Trinity partners with Diaspora, a new festival celebrating the diverse communities of Bristol and the South West

Celebrating The South West’s Global Communities

by <object object at 0x7fa9ec990580> last modified 12/04/2024 03:56 PM

DIASPORA! Festival Flag Making Workshop

DIASPORA! Festival is a vibrant celebration of people, arts, culture, film, and more, taking place at host venues across the city on Early May Bank Holiday weekend 03 - 06 May. Brought to the South West by Diverse Artists Network, the festival aims to reflect the rich variety of talent within the south west’s global communities, with an emphasis on the creative arts that reside within these communities. Trinity is very proud to be partnering with Diverse Artist Network to bring Diaspora to Trinity, through a programme of workshops, music events and arts.

“Brilliant people, really welcoming and great level of diversity and lovely to talk to people from different backgrounds” - Diaspora! Flag Making Workshop Participant

As part of Diaspora’s engagement fringe programme in the lead up to their festival weekend, Trinity partnered up with them to deliver their programme of free creative workshops named ‘Flag Up Your Identity’. These workshops were open to all and served to unleash the creativity of the workshop participants to make a unique flag that embodied their identity and heritage. Participants were encouraged to create unique flags influenced by their cultural roots and their personal journey. Over the Easter period, Trinity welcomed over 30 participants who made wonderful flags which will be showcased at Trinity and other locations around the city.

DIASPORA! Festival continues throughout the May bank holiday weekend, kicking off with the official opening ceremony for the festival taking place on Friday 03 May 4pm – 7pm. Expect an evening of dance, music, poetry, food, and folklore, showcasing the extraordinary talents of our local community while fostering meaningful cross-cultural connections. Tickets are free, find out more here.

After the opening ceremony on 03 May, we will be hosting Pangea at Trinity. Pangea is a club night which celebrates sound system music from around the globe, bringing together a diverse range of genres including Samba, Bhangra, highlife, gospel, dancehall and much more. Click here to get tickets.

Closing out proceedings, on Sunday 05 May we have Alkebulan, African Storytelling Village, a day of African arts and culture featuring captivating storytelling to vibrant dance performances. Featuring local artists from the likes of Kabbo Hue Ferdinand, MoYah, Ian Solomon-Kawall, Penny Avery, and Mohammed Errebba, this event promises an unforgettable cultural showcase. Find out more here.

We are very proud to be partnering with Diverse Artists Network for DIASPORA! Festival, highlighting our commitment to providing accessible cultural events for the community, and a space to learn arts and crafts as well as opportunities for participants to skill share.

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Vacancy: Assistant Bar Manager

by sarah last modified 10/04/2024 12:29 PM
Apply to join the Trinity Team

Vacancy: Assistant Bar Manager

by sarah last modified 10/04/2024 12:29 PM

Dundundun - Image Credit: Khali Ackford

Title: Assistant Bar Manager

Contract type: Permanent

Reporting to: Bar Manager

Direct Reports: Bar Staff

Hours: 15hr pw basic plus shifts – flexible

Rate of Pay: £12.80 - £13.69 starting rate depending on experience + 10% enhancement for anti-social hours

Trinity Community Arts is seeking an ambitious and self motivated Assistant Bar Manager to join the Trinity Team to run our bar operations and assist with the smooth running of our live music entertainment, events and hire services. ​

The role will require someone who is willing to work flexibly according to our growing events calendar. This is an ideal role for community minded music and arts lovers who would like to lead our friendly, hardworking and motivated bar team to help us raise vital funds to support our charitable activities and ensure the Trinity Centre has a sustainable future, not reliant on grant-funding.​

You will be responsible for overseeing a small team, ensuring shifts are staffed sufficiently, meeting sales and profitability targets, creating a welcoming environment for guests, and adhering to any H&S and licensing legislation.​

The role will suit someone who is keen to promote a positive working environment and encourage development among the team, as well as feeding back to the programming team with ideas around extending our offering to the local community.

How to apply:

  • Download and read the recruitment pack here
  • Download and complete the application form here and email to info@trinitybristol.org.uk with "Assistant Bar Manager" in the subject line.
  • Complete our anonymous Equal Opportunities form here

Please note we do not accept CV applications.​​

If having read this recruitment pack you would like to ask questions before making an application, then you are welcome to email info@trinitybristol.org.uk with any questions you may have.  ​

 

The closing date for receipt of applications is Monday 20 May 2024 at 5pm

Interviews will be held week commencing 27 May 2024

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Vacancy: Bar Manager

by sarah last modified 10/04/2024 12:30 PM
Apply to join the Trinity Team

Vacancy: Bar Manager

by sarah last modified 10/04/2024 12:30 PM

Garden Party 2023 - Image Credit: Alastair Brookes

Job Title: Bar Manager

Contract type: Permanent

Reporting to: Venue & Operations Manager​

Direct reports: Assistant Bar Manager/Bar staff

Hours: 22.5hr pw basic plus shifts – flexible.

Rate of Pay: £13.93 - £14.91 starting rate depending on experience +10% enhancement for anti-social hours

We are seeking a ambitious and self motivated Bar Manager to join the Trinity Team to run our bar operations and assist with the smooth running of our live music entertainment, events and hire services. ​

​The role will require someone who is willing to work flexibly according to our growing events calendar. This is an ideal role for community minded music and arts lovers who would like to lead our friendly, hardworking and motivated bar team to help us raise vital funds to support our charitable activities and ensure the Trinity Centre has a sustainable future, not reliant on grant-funding.​

​You will be responsible for overseeing a small team, ensuring shifts are staffed sufficiently, meeting sales and profitability targets, creating a welcoming environment for guests, and adhering to any H&S and licensing legislation.​

​The role will suit someone who is keen to promote a positive working environment and encourage development among the team, as well as feeding back to the programming team with ideas around extending our offering to the local community. ​

How to apply:

  • Download and read the recruitment pack here
  • Download and complete the application form here and email to info@trinitybristol.org.uk with "Bar Manager" in the subject line.
  • Complete our anonymous Equal Opportunities form here

Please note we do not accept CV applications.​​

If having read this recruitment pack you would like to ask questions before making an application, then you are welcome to email info@trinitybristol.org.uk with any questions you may have.  ​

The closing date for receipt of applications is ​
Monday 05 May 2024 at 5pm. ​

Interviews will be held week commencing 13 May 2024.

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Movement & wellbeing for local families

by sarah last modified 28/03/2024 04:08 PM
Support from West of England Sport Trust to expand our schools based offer

Movement & wellbeing for local families

by sarah last modified 28/03/2024 04:08 PM
Movement & wellbeing for local families

Movema

Movema

Carnival workshops at Trinity.Photo Alastair Brookes/KoLAB Studios

With the support of West of England Sport Trust (Wesport) we are expanding our creative offer for primary-aged children living/ attending school within the locality.

Through our partnership work with local primary schools, we will be working with Easton Academy to offer key stage 1 and key stage 2 children free-to-access after school activities, a summer school as well as provision for parents/carers.

Building upon previous projects, including last year's Easter Carnival workshops and 2022/23 ‘World in a Box’ programme, leading dance company Movema will embed themselves within the school to deliver the programme that aims to encourage schools to offer their facilities for activities that encourage healthy and active lives.

‘We are thrilled to be supporting local partners through our place-based work. Through supporting schools to open their facilities outside of the school day to both school and community users, we hope to create sustainable change in increased physical activity levels in communities where they are needed most.” Nicole Emmanuel, West of England Sport Trust

Shaping the offer to reach children, who may be living in under-resourced communities, Movema will host after-school clubs that will include dance and movement workshops. They will also work with teachers and children to shape and deliver a creative offer for free activities during the summer break.

Our Children and Young People's team will collaborate with parent/carers at Easton Academy to develop free to access sessions that will take place within the school to encourage movement, active lives and improve wellbeing.

The programme will run until March 2025 and will further support our ‘Cultural Alliance’ a partnership with three-local schools. Developed through conversations with primary school pupils, teachers, governors and community organisations, the Alliance aims to address existing gaps that many children experience in accessing creative activities as well as strengthening the educational growth and wellbeing of children.

You can find out more about our Children and Young People's programme here or sign up to our mailing list to keep-up to date.

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Performance for Children and Families

by <object object at 0x7fa9ec990580> last modified 28/03/2024 09:46 AM
We brought Igloo, an interactive early year's performance, to Trinity as part of our Children and Young People’s programme

Performance for Children and Families

by <object object at 0x7fa9ec990580> last modified 28/03/2024 09:46 AM
Performance for Children and Families

Igloo Travelling Light

Igloo - Image Credit: Alastair Brookes

As part of our Children and Young People’s programme, we brought Igloo, an interactive early year's performance, to Trinity. Igloo was created by Barton Hill-based Travelling Light Theatre. The company created the show specifically to tour to non-traditional theatre venues with the aim of breaking down barriers to accessing theatre.

We connected with our partners, Central Bristol Children Centre, to offer children (and their grown ups) who attend the centre’s weekly Stay & Play at Trinity, the opportunity to watch the show for free. Igloo was shared in a separate space running alongside Stay & Play, allowing families to choose if they wanted to give the performance a try during a familiar group session. In total we welcomed over 100 families/carers to two performances of Igloo.

Through feedback from conversations between children, families and local community groups and building upon our pledges we are looking at ways to create a responsive programme that aims to offer young children the opportunity to take their first steps in their creative journey.

Coming up in the summer we are pleased to host theatre company Tidal Tales who will be bring their latest show, Fairy Forest: Stories from the Trees, for an outdoor performance. This follows the 'The Hare the Moon and the River' that we programmed as part of our Summer Sessions last year.

You can keep up to date with our our Children and Young People's programme here or to hear about upcoming events and activities sign up to our mailing list here

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Emerging Musician performance

by <object object at 0x7fa9ec990580> last modified 27/03/2024 02:17 PM
Young People from our Next Gen Sounds programme performed at the opening night of Off The Record's Exhibition

Emerging Musician performance

by <object object at 0x7fa9ec990580> last modified 27/03/2024 02:17 PM
Emerging Musician performance

Image Credit: Alastair Brookes

Next Gen Sounds Performance - Image Credit: Alastair Brookes

Young people from our free weekly music project, Next Gen Sounds, were invited to perform during Off The Record (OTR)’s exhibition at Trinity. We work in partnership with the OTR team who come along to the weekly Next-Gen sessions as an additional offer for young people.

“It was really great to get the chance to perform live, it’s so much fun, Trinity really give us a lot of chances to perform in front of an audience. It’s really fantastic to be able to play here” - Joe, Next Gen Sounds Participant

On the night, young people from Next Gen Sounds took to the stage for one hour. Giving incredible musical performances, from bands playing covers of much-loved songs by Fleetwood Mac and Radiohead, to acoustic solo performances, rap, and DJ sets, demonstrating the wide range of musical styles that the young people are exploring as part of Next Gen.

OTR’s exhibition featured paintings, drawings, photography, poetry and of course music from Next Gen. Our Next Gen Sounds sessions are supported by staff from OTR who bring their expertise around mental health and wellbeing to the group sessions, ensuring that the support offered by the programme focuses not only on young people’s musical abilities, but also provides a safe space for personal support, in which the young people can develop their confidence, interpersonal skills, and support their mental wellbeing.

As part of our Children and Young Peoples' programme we offer ways in which those aged 0-25yrs can take their first and next steps in creativity. Next Gen creates pathways for young people to develop their musical practice; from supporting song writing, to demystifying music production, and music masterclasses to eventually offering the young people a platform to perform their music to a live audience.

If you'd like to find out more about Next Gen Sounds, or get involved with the sessions yourself, click here for more information.

 

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In Conversation: Liam and Nature Play

by <object object at 0x7fa9ec990580> last modified 27/03/2024 01:06 PM
We spoke to Trinity's Nature Play Lead, Liam, about the after-school garden project

In Conversation: Liam and Nature Play

by <object object at 0x7fa9ec990580> last modified 27/03/2024 01:06 PM

Nature Play After School Club - Image Credit: Alastair Brookes

As part of our children and young people's programme offer free after school provision for children who attend local primary schools. Children who attend are aged 8yrs-11yrs and many may limited access to any green space at home. We caught up with Liam Callaghan, who delivers the Nature Play sessions to find out more.

Hi! Please introduce yourself and tell us a little about your background

I’m Liam, the Nature Play lead at Trinity – I have a passion for youth work, having written and illustrated my first children’s book, worked with SEND children for several years and facilitated a variety of workshops for young people.

A How did you get involved with Nature Play at Trinity?

I've been leading the Nature Play project since its beginnings in September 2023. I spent a lot of time at Trinity Centre attending various events before I became a part of the team – I first helped with a Nature Play workshop over the summer of 2023 and through this, Trinity reached out with the opportunity of working together long-term on a similar project, and here I am!

What is the Nature Play project?

The after-school Nature Play sessions we run are a perfect opportunity for local 8-11-year-olds to spend some quality time out in nature, thanks to our beautiful garden space in the heart of Bristol. We operate a walking bus from 3 local primary schools to maximise our outreach and have seen amazing results. We began by having the children create a set of ground rules, which they all agreed on, based around respect and getting involved.

So what do the sessions involve?

After introducing the children to the garden space at Trinty, there was still fruit growing in the garden, so the children would pick apples from the apple tree when they arrived as a tasty snack. Most weeks they would forage flavours to make their own tea, learning about when certain plants fruit, the physics of heat drawing out the flavours and nutrients to make the tea, as well as the communal nature of making and sharing tea together. The group are always very happy to show any newcomers around the garden space – they have found a real sense of security and belonging in the garden and have a great sense of agency within the space.

As the nights grew longer, the children learned about how winter is a necessary part of the life cycle, and how we can relate to the seasons within our own lives, have ‘sunny seasons’ and ‘chilly spells’. They also learned how to safely make a fire to get us through the wintry weather, with some children helping others overcome their fear of flames. The children loved sharing stories around the fire (some scarier than others!), instilling a warm sense of community.

What's the plan for Nature Play going forward into the spring?

As we Spring into 2024, the children have begun making use of their raised bed, dedicated to the after-school club (which they have nearly finished decorating) as well as space in the polytunnel, where the children have been learning how and when to plant different veg (and why) and learning about seasonal changes and the effect climate change is having on us and other parts of the world. Some children have some prior knowledge which they have been happy to share with others during the sessions, building a sense of communal skill sharing.

What benefits do you think the children involved with Nature Play gain?

The children who attend the sessions  have really blossomed over the months, and there’s been noticeable growth in individuals’ confidence, knowledge and overall wellbeing as well as seeing friendships being formed. I can’t wait to see how the children grow over the coming months.

If you are a parent/carer of a primary aged child (8yrs-11yrs) who would like to attend Nature Play click here to find out more and sign up.

Nature Play is held on Monday's during term time and is made possible due to funding from Quartet Community Foundation, WESport and Bristol City Council.


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In Conversation: David Jubb and Citizens for Culture

by <object object at 0x7fa9ec990580> last modified 27/03/2024 11:30 AM

In Conversation: David Jubb and Citizens for Culture

by <object object at 0x7fa9ec990580> last modified 27/03/2024 11:30 AM

Image Credit: Alastair Brookes

In partnership with St Pauls Carnival, Citizens In Power and West of England Combined Authority we are delivering a Citizens’ Assembly for Culture in 2025.

This ground-breaking initiative will bring together people from across the region, to meet with creative practitioners, cultural providers and decision-makers to shape the future of a cultural delivery plan for the region.

We are currently recruiting for a Producer to help with the successful delivery of the Assembly. We caught up with David Jubb, Co-Director of Citizens In Power, to find out more about the role, the Citizens for Culture project and the plans for the 2025 Assembly.

Hi David! Tell us more about the role and what they'll be working on.

This is a role that I wish had been around when I was developing my practice as a producer. I would have jumped at it. The role will oversee the entire citizens’ assembly process over the coming 12 months. This will include all the current development stages, procuring key partners and laying the groundwork for the UK’s first citizens’ assembly to create a cultural plan for an entire region. The role will work closely with assembly members, supporting their needs and ensuring that each one has a positive and inspiring experience. They will also establish the framework for the assembly’s recommendations to be carried forward. I think one of the many exciting things about the role is that citizen-led decision-making, such as citizens’ juries, citizens’ assemblies and panels, are growing in the creative and cultural sector. So the successful candidate will put themselves in an interesting position in terms of the future opportunities in the sector.

The ideal candidate would be someone who believes in the idea of citizens’ assemblies and cultural democracy, is committed to equity and inclusion in their practice, excels in complex projects with multiple partners, and has an interest in the strategic side of producing. What I mean by this is not just a desire to nail the deliverables each day, but on how those deliverables link to a wider set of strategic aims and partners. This project is a lot about inviting people to work together to lead change – so if they have a passion for supporting change then the role would suit them very well.

Who would the Citizens’ Assembly Producer get to work with?

They would work closely with all the project partners: LaToyah McAllister-Jones, Executive Director of St Pauls Carnival; Emma Harvey, CEO of Trinity; Sarah James, Creative and Cultural Programme Lead at the West of England Combined Authority. Each partner brings different experiences to the project. LaToyah works with Involve to facilitate assemblies as well as her extensive professional experience in and out of the cultural sector. Emma has been a driving force for how cultural buildings can use creativity as a tool for civic participation. Sarah is leading Culture West, a regional programme which brings practitioners together to create a transformational shift to co-created models of practice. The producer would also work with me. My background is in the cultural sector. I was artistic director and CEO of Battersea Arts Centre from 2004-19, before becoming more interested in citizen-led decision-making. Last year I co-founded Citizens In Power as a not-for-profit organisation, with the purpose to co-design ways for citizens to lead decision-making.

In addition to the project partners, the producer would work with the assembly’s Oversight Panel and Advisory Panel, independent groups who will advise on equity and inclusion, and select evidence for the assembly to consider. They will also collaborate with the Lead Facilitator, the Combined Authority and four Unitary Authorities, the assembly’s funding partners, Arts Council England and Gulbenkian Foundation, and everyone involved in the production and logistics of the assembly itself. It’s a big team!

What does success look like for you within this project?

By having a citizens’ assembly for creativity and culture, the project aims to democratise decision-making in the cultural sector. The assembly will empower citizens to co-create a vibrant, inclusive cultural delivery plan for the West of England. It’s important to know that when we say “citizens” we mean people who live, work or stay in a place – i.e. everyone! Success will be a project that constantly challenges itself on issues of equity and inclusion.

Essential success measures are inclusive participation, constructive deliberation and actionable recommendations. We are involving both citizens and practitioners from the sector in the design of the assembly to help us achieve this. Of course, the real test of success for Citizens for Culture will be the delivery of the assembly’s outcomes. This will require the collaboration of lots of different partners: from councils, sector organisations, communities, funders to individuals, all working together to make change happen. We need to grow many of these partnerships in advance of the assembly happening in 2025. We also hope Citizens For Culture provides inspiration for other councils and funders which are seeking to create future delivery plans by putting citizens at the heart of the process.

Anything else you would like to add?

I think this promises to be an inspiring project. I can guarantee that the successful candidate, whether coming with a cultural sector background, or a background in deliberative democracy, will learn lots and widen the kinds of opportunities they can pursue in the future. Come and work with us! Deadline for application is Tuesday 9th April at 5pm and application information is here.

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Protecting community Spaces

by sarah last modified 13/03/2024 11:22 AM
Trinity, Eastside Community Trust and Windmill Hill City Farm launch joint manifesto calling to protect shared spaces

Protecting community Spaces

by sarah last modified 13/03/2024 11:22 AM
Protecting community Spaces

Igloo

Trinity Garden Party

Trinity's Garden Party. Credit: Alistair Brookes

Trinity join Eastside Community Trust, Windmill Hill City Farm and 13 other organisations to call for urgent action to protect and enhance Bristol’s shared spaces.

The initiative calls for urgent measures to safeguard and improve Bristol’s shared spaces, which are currently under threat due to various challenges, including legislation facilitating council property sales to address budget shortfalls.

“Unfortunately, without changes to how decisions are made about community infrastructure, the future of those spaces will always be at risk. The suggestions we are putting forward will enable us to secure a brighter future for our much-loved community spaces" Steve Sayers, CEO of Windmill Hill City Farm

In a published manifesto we join others in calling for for several changes to ensure community buildings are appropriately valued. This includes:

  • Review the Community Asset Transfer (CAT) process, to enable more community organisations to consider this route.
  • Adopt a target and strategy for increasing the number of community owned assets, in line with the One City Plan.
  • Delegate leadership for community assets to a member of cabinet or committee, recognizing the sector’s role across council departments.
  • Delegate authority to officer level to award CAT leases, for 95 years, when these are up for renewal.
  • Include representation from Neighbourhoods and Committees in the CAT decision-making committees.
  • Create a framework for protection and disposal of council owned assets, including creating a new ‘community’ asset class which prioritises preservation of community spaces.
  • Implement a fair rent structure which recognises the social and investment benefits of community-owned assets.
  • Develop a capital investment strategy for organisations with CAT leases

How you can help:

  • Read the full manifesto here
  • Decisions makers, city and business leaders are invited to talk to us directly, understand more about the work we do and see how these changes could enable us to make a much greater impact across the whole city.
  • People of Bristol are invited to share their thoughts and feelings on what their local community space means to them, by writing on a ribbon or sharing a word, sentence or memory on social media using the hashtag #CommunityRoots.

The Community Anchor organisations who created the campaign and manifesto are:

  1. Eastside Community Trust
  2. Trinity Community Arts
  3. Windmill Hill City Farm
  4. Black South West Network (The Coach House)
  5. Lockleaze Neighbourhood Trust
  6. Knowle West Health Park
  7. Knowle West Alliance
  8. Southmead Development Trust
  9. Redcatch Community Garden Limited
  10. Ambition Lawrence Weston
  11. Bricks/St Anne’s House
  12. Artspace Lifespace
  13. St Werburghs Community Centre
  14. Filwood Community Centre
  15. Voscur
  16. Learning Partnership West

 

 

 

 

 

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Free creative courses for Young People

by sarah last modified 12/03/2024 02:29 PM
Find out more about about Speak Out Free creative workshops for young people

Free creative courses for Young People

by sarah last modified 12/03/2024 02:29 PM
Free creative courses for Young People

Speak Out - Image Credit: Alastair Brookes

Speak Out!

Speak Out Celebration 2023. Credit Alastair Brookes

Speak Out is a programme of free creative courses exploring ways in which creativity can be used to shine a light on Future Proofing (or, thinking about our impact on the planet), Neurodiversity and Injustice.

Delivered in partnership with City of Bristol College, Bristol Refugee Festival and Our Second Home, from Feb - June 2024 Trinity will host a series of workshops delivered by a professional artist or facilitator. The sessions will offer a supportive young people to develop creative and craft skills, be inspired by new ideas and build interpersonal and collaborative skills.

The programme was developed following an in-depth consultation with over 150 young people that took place in 2023. This included Trinity's CYP team visiting further education settings, schools, community organisations as well as an in-person event at Trinity.

Speak Out Programme:

Future Proofing – Students of City of Bristol College will explore their impact on the planet. Led by Carene, a sustainable fashion expert, the cohort will explore ways in which they can fight against fast fashion. Running Feb - Mar 2024

Neurodiversity - Kabbo Ferdinand, an African Indigenous storyteller and musician, and Natasha Gatward, an immersive performance artist and costume designer, invite 16 – 18 year olds to explore the ways in which movement and expression can explore Neurodiversity. Running April 2024.

Injustice – Hip-Hop artist Moyah, who has lived experience of the asylum system, will lead workshops for young people affected by the asylum system in order to create a performance piece addressing injustice. Running April 2024.

Speak Out Showcase: Young people who have taken part in Speak Out are invited to come together in celebration of their work at a showcase event at Trinity Centre. Each groups’ practitioners will be at the showcase to support the young people and to guide them through the experience of publicly sharing their art (17th June 6-8pm).

If you would like to sign up to the workshops please contact Liam, Youth Services Facilitator on liamc@trinitybristol.org.uk

 

Speak Out! Is supported by the We Move Fund: Youth Social Action aims to empower Black children and young people through Youth Social Action.


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In Conversation: Saláma Kefentse and All Ah Wi Women's Group

by <object object at 0x7fa9ec990580> last modified 06/03/2024 02:23 PM

In Conversation: Saláma Kefentse and All Ah Wi Women's Group

by <object object at 0x7fa9ec990580> last modified 06/03/2024 02:23 PM

 

As part of the celebrations for this year's International Women’s Day, we caught up with Saláma Kefentse from All Ah Wi Women's group ahead of their Saturday 09 Mar event at Trinity. Click here to find out more about Saturday's International Women's Day Celebrations at Trinity.

Q: Hi! Tell us a little about yourself and the All Ah Wi Women's group:

A: My name is Saláma and I started All Ah Wi Women's group last year under my brand name Just Love Hub.

The All Ah Wi Women's group is a space for all women, especially those from the Caribbean and African diaspora. The group offers a sense of sisterhood and freedom to be just as you are without the added titles of mum, daughter, sister, aunty etc. It's an opportunity to spend time focusing on their needs rather than the needs of others.

Q: Where did the idea of the International Womens Day event come from?

After a joint conversation with staff at Trinity the idea was offered for us host an event to celebrate International Womens Day. They offered this opportunity to us and as the women in our group possess such inspiring skills and talents it seemed a great idea to offer them the space to showcase what they can do and show how amazing they are.

The group was developed because we need to have a space to go to with women who looked like me and could relate to the ups and downs life throws at us, have a laugh, a cry and a moan without judgement. Be free to try new things and talk about topics that aren't typical but create awareness and are thought provoking.

Q: What can we expect from the event?

Expect great music from DJ Kissan and DJ Delicious, Essential oil 101 from spiritual healer Michelle Meridith and a workshop on 5 steps to overcoming childhood trauma with Author Carmen Carrol, hosted by the All Ah Wi Women's group.

Q: Why do you think celebrations like International Women’s Day are important?

Events like these give women the chance to shine a light for each other and be seen for who they are and what they do. It brings women together and shares good energy, healing and connection. We get to congratulate our sister's for their hard work and be inspired by them too.

Q: How can people get involved or help All Ah Wi Womens group?

The All Ah Wi Women's group is looking for volunteer session leaders to help organise and run the sessions and board members / trustees to start as a CIC to help with fundraising to bring the ideas these women have created to life.

The All Ah Wi Womens International Womens Day event is on 09 Mar 2024 from 10am – 3pm and features workshops from Michelle Meridith and Carmen Carol, music by DJs Kissan and Delicious and Podcasting form Keep It Real Podcast, click here to find out more.

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Vacancy: Citizens' Assembly Producer

by sarah last modified 27/03/2024 11:33 AM
Apply to join the team for the region wide 2025 Citizens' Assembly for culture

Vacancy: Citizens' Assembly Producer

by sarah last modified 27/03/2024 11:33 AM

Understory

Understory Mapping workshop. Photo Alastair Brookes

Title: Citizens Assembly Producer

Contract type: 12-month contract (with potential for extension) Freelance may be considered.

Reporting to: Citizens' Assembly Project Manager

Hours: Part time 2-2.5 days per week

Rate of Pay: £32, 000 - £34,144.50 (pro-rata)

Trinity Community Arts is seeking an experienced and dynamic Producer to collaborate with us and our partners, St Pauls Carnival, Citizens In Power and West of England Combined Authority, on the successful delivery of the 2024/5 Citizens’ Assembly for Culture.

This ground-breaking initiative aims to bring together citizens from across the region to meet with creative practitioners, cultural providers and decision-makers to shape the future of a cultural delivery plan for the region.

The Citizens' Assembly Producer  is a pivotal role that will successfully plan and oversee the delivery of the Assembly, drive a programme of engagement activities and events and work with the project partners to embed the methodology across the region to enable the planning and delivery of future citizens’ assemblies. ​

We recognise that this role is likely to be suited to candidates with either:​

  • experience of producing large participatory projects in or around the creative and cultural sectors; or ​

  • experience of working on citizens’ assemblies or other forms of deliberative or participatory democracy​

How to apply:

  • Download and read the recruitment pack here
  • Download and complete the application form here and email to info@trinitybristol.org.uk with "Citizens' Assembly Producer" in the subject line.
  • Complete our anonymous Equal Opportunities form here
  • Click here to download a word version of the recruitment pack

Please note we do not accept CV applications.​​

If having read this recruitment pack you would like to ask questions before making an application, then you are welcome to email info@trinitybristol.org.uk with any questions you may have.  ​

 

The closing date for receipt of applications is Tuesday 09 April 2024 at 5pm.

Interviews will be held week commencing 15 April 2024.

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Opinion: Holding Onto Our Roofs When The Sun Ain’t Shining

by <object object at 0x7fa9ec990580> last modified 21/02/2024 04:30 PM
CEO Emma Harvey asks: In austere times, how do we retain and maintain community buildings?

Opinion: Holding Onto Our Roofs When The Sun Ain’t Shining

by <object object at 0x7fa9ec990580> last modified 21/02/2024 04:30 PM

Jacobs Wells Baths - Image Credit: Sam Prosser

Preserving and maintaining community spaces is proving increasingly difficult as local authorities grapple with continued budgetary pressures. Some local authorities are facing or have already issued Section 114 notices – which means expected income isn’t enough to cover expenditure. In response, the Government is considering making it easier for councils to dispose of publicly owned assets to cover rising costs of essential services. Financial news provider, Bloomberg, sets out how, “The move would mark a sharp relaxation of the current constraints, which prevent councils from using money from asset sales to meet budget pressures from day-to-day services without approval from the central government.”

"The choices we make now in response to the challenge of preserving civic and cultural infrastructure in the face of financial uncertainty is a decision that will have lasting consequences for future generations" Emma Harvey

Community groups and charities are collaborating to devise shared solutions to protect civic and cultural assets from disposal and loss; from volunteering to manage local allotments and raising money to invest in parks and play areas, to taking on ownership of local pubs or community buildings and developing their own Neighbourhood Plans.

Whilst there are individual success stories of spaces saved, the challenge lies in how we create a national community asset transfer approach that is replicable, scalable and sustainable. As Brendan Conway, a leading voice in community assets, sets out in a LinkedIn post at the start of the year; “we must not valorise small precedents that have hidden foundations and assume that they are replicable.”

The current model places communities under increasing pressure to do more, though they may not equally hold all the necessary resources to convert short-term passion into sustained success. Existing funding schemes tied to short-term political cycles overlook the complexities of such projects, which require a variety of factors to align. Passionate people who care will inevitably overcommit and inexperienced individuals will underestimate what’s necessary to sustain a recovery effort over time. Some communities may hold the aspiration, but struggle to channel the right energy, investment or efforts consistently and continually. Others may just be overwhelmed, fatigued, or disheartened from past failed efforts to save the things they’ve loved and lost. This could lead to an increasingly disproportionate distribution of social resources, unless we proactively lay the foundations required to enhance success rates equitably across the breadth of UK communities.

The solution as to how we preserve civic and cultural infrastructure amidst financial uncertainty requires a nuanced, adaptable and holistic approach. It’s a delicate balancing act that, if we fail to get right, will leave our communities of tomorrow without the infrastructure they need to allow our more diverse, more densely populated neighbourhoods to function. The more we embark on these ambitious, quirky, complex projects, the more we will see projects fail. Should sites revert back to local authority control at a point where resources and capacity has further depleted, this will only compound risk of future asset disposal, not least because now one might also point to how the community tried, but failed to make it work.

In Bristol, there are a number of organisations driving a community ownership movement and a more strategic approach to community asset management, such as Bristol’s Community Anchor Network who have launched a manifesto to ask for more targeted support and investment to protect the city’s social fabric. More widely, Platform Places are collaborating with councils, community asset managers and owners to repurpose vacant high street properties, whilst Locality are continuing to promote their #SaveOurSpaces campaign by launching a new “community power revolution” to place more power in the hands of communities.

The choices we make now in response to the challenge of preserving civic and cultural infrastructure in the face of financial uncertainty is a decision that will have lasting consequences for future generations. To ensure a resilient and culturally vibrant future for UK communities expanding in diversity and population density, we must adopt a nuanced, bespoke and holistic approach to the assets that underpin our daily lives; one that embraces all the complexities, personalities and idiosyncrasies of our changing social and cultural landscape. And we need to do that pretty soon, before we have no space left to fight for.

Emma Harvey, CEO Trinity Community Arts

#SoldFromUnderYou

#SaveOurSpaces

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Look Back: Models of Listening and Participation in Culture

by <object object at 0x7fa9ec990580> last modified 19/02/2024 05:00 PM
Reflections on taking part in Isto é PARTIS & Art for Change

Look Back: Models of Listening and Participation in Culture

by <object object at 0x7fa9ec990580> last modified 19/02/2024 05:00 PM

Isto é PARTIS & Art for Change 2024 - Image Credit: Carlos Porfirio

In January, Trinity participated in the Isto é PARTIS & Art for Change 2024 conference held in Lisbon, Portugal, shining a spotlight on the transformative potential of citizen-led approaches in the arts.

The Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation and "La Caixa" Foundation are actively working to platform and support the tangible impact of participatory arts initiatives, reshaping cultural dynamics, and fostering more just and cohesive communities. The conference served as a beacon for continued dialogue and action in the pursuit of a more inclusive cultural landscape.

Featuring panels exploring diverse methods of citizen involvement in cultural dynamics, Trinity Community Arts, represented by CEO Emma Harvey, emphasized the significance of creative community spaces in shaping cultural dynamics in the arts. Emma shared insights into Trinity's work managing the Trinity Centre as a publicly-owned civic arts space, alongside efforts to save another publicly-owned asset, Jacobs Wells.

Trinity shared a panel with Lara Seixo Rodrigues, Marta Silva, and Miguel Atalaia, highlighting examples of collaborative and citizen-led cultural activity, including the Largo Residências in Lisbon and the Bons Sons festival in Tomar. Bons Sons - akin to Trinity's annual Garden Party, the annual community festival involves the entire village coming together to deliver a celebration of music, culture and local pride—an inspirational example of true citizen empowerment.

Trinity's partner, Saad Eddine Said, Co-Director of the Citizens in Power initiative, delivered a keynote speech on avenues for active citizen-led decision-making. Trinity, in is working with Citizens in Power and St Paul’s Carnival, to develop a Citizen Assembly for Culture, supporting communities in the West of England Combined Authority to shape their cultural delivery priorities and plans – funded by Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation (UK Branch) and the West of England Combined Authority. The conference also highlighted Battersea Arts Centre’s social enterprise programme, The Agency, which uses a co-design model to support young people to unlock their creative potential.

This collaborative effort, led by The Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, amplified initiatives that are unlocking the transformative power of citizen-led approaches in the arts. The Foundation's commitment to fostering partnerships between communities, creatives, and institutions, as showcased in the PARTIS & Art for Change initiative, exemplifies a forward-thinking approach to shaping the future of towns and cities. This conference facilitates key conversations and projects that contribute to the creation of more just, cohesive and culturally vibrant communities.

Further reading:

  • Read our blogs on creating a Citizens' Assembly for Culture 12, 3,  4 and 5
  •  

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    Celebrating Windrush

    by sarah last modified 02/02/2024 10:22 AM
    Celebrating the stories of the Windrush generation through a year long programme of creative activity

    Celebrating Windrush

    by sarah last modified 02/02/2024 10:22 AM
    Celebrating Windrush

    St Paul's Carnival Film Screening - Image Credit: Donovon Jackson

    Festus market

    Festus Market. Photo credit: KoLAB Studios

    Throughout 2023, we celebrated the 75th Anniversary of Windrush through our community arts programme. Working with key partners including St Paul’s Carnival, Ujima Radio, Eastside Community Trust and the Malcolm X Centre, we created a community-led project to celebrate the communities who moved to Bristol during the 1950s and to give voice to Caribbean elders' experiences, resilience and memories.

    "I had wicked fun. When are you doing it again?" Feedback, Festus

    In partnership with Tamasha Theatre and Coney, we supported the creation of 'Duppy Hunter', an audio adventure set on the streets of St Paul’s. The script was developed during the summer of 2023 with the support of current and former St Paul’s residents and members of Malcom X elders. The listening experience went live in October to coincide with Black History Month. We organised a special listening party in November for the Malcolm X Elders who were unable to experience the walking tour due to their access needs.

    In partnership with Eastside Community Trust, we programmed a screening of 'Barrel Children' at Easton Community Centre. The film explores the challenges of Black families separated by migration during the Windrush era.

    In December, we hosted 'Festus' - an all-day event celebrating Caribbean/Black British culture. During the day we open the door for an indoor craft market led by Black traders and invited acclaimed, locally-based poet, Zaykia Mckenzie to perform to traders and visitors. Alongside this, Ofeila Balogun from Irie Dance Company led a Caribbean/African dance workshop.

    As part of the evening's celebrations we screened 'Inna Wi Carnival', a documentary film commemorating the role of Bristol’s Caribbean elders in establishing the first St Paul’s Carnival. This was followed with a quiz, party games, dance floor 'foolery' and a performance by rapper/spoken word artist Jonny Steel.

    Across the year the project connected with over 500 people - using arts and entertainment to share, explore and celebrate the history and experiences of the Windrush generations in Bristol. Due to the success of the Festus market, we will be working with stakeholders to bring additional events in 2024 - watch this space.

    National Lottery community fund

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    Celebrating Independent Venue Week

    by <object object at 0x7fa9ec990580> last modified 30/01/2024 01:28 PM
    Independent venues in Bristol and their vital contribution to the local music scene

    Celebrating Independent Venue Week

    by <object object at 0x7fa9ec990580> last modified 30/01/2024 01:28 PM

    Bristol's Idles filmed their video in independent venues

    Trinity is proud to be an grassroots music venue and this Independent Venue Week Marketing Assistant, Sam Prosser, shines a light on some of the other brilliant independent venues the city has to offer and how gig-goers can support the venues in Bristol.

    Strange Brew

    Strange Brew, located on Fairfax Street in Central Bristol, is one of the city’s newest independent venues. Having opened in September 2020, Strange Brew has quickly become of the city’s key locations for DIY bands and promoters, providing an eclectic mix of club nights, gigs, exhibitions and talks. We’re very excited to be bringing Bristol’s own Waldo’s Gift to Strange Brew on 02 March as part of our in-house music programme, Trinity Presents.

    The Louisiana

    The Louisiana is a 140-capacity, family-run venue that takes pride in putting on the best musicians from Bristol and beyond for the last 35 years, becoming a vital space for emerging artists, as well as hosting some of the UK’s biggest artists in their early years, such as Coldplay, Muse and Idles. The Louisiana is now a key part of Bristol’s music scene, as part of Dot To Dot Festival and Harbour Festival.

    Exchange

    Located a stone’s throw from Trinity at the bottom of Old Market, Exchange is a Community Benefit Society focused on supporting a wide range of musical projects and creative endeavours. Exchange opened it’s doors as a Live Music / Club Venue in August 2012. Since opening they have played host to a wide array of artists including The 1975, Haim, Four Tet and many more.

    How you can support independent venues:

    It’s never been more important to recognise the massive contribution of independent venues and their role in the music scene. 2023 was the UK’s worst year for venue closures, with Music Venues Trust reporting that 125 grassroots venues closed over the last 12 months. More than ever, it is vital that we recognise and support the independent music venues that contribute so much.

    Buying tickets directly from venues: By buying tickets directly from a venue’s website, or from a local ticketing platform, you are ensuring that a higher percentage of the ticket price goes directly to the venue, supporting their operational costs and staff. In addition to this, early ticket purchases also make a significant impact, providing venues with crucial upfront revenue and helping them plan and execute events seamlessly.

    Supporting venues through bar sales: Bar sales are one of the primary sources of income for independent venues, so make sure you get down early and buy a drink or two to support your favourite venue. Choosing to enjoy refreshments at the venue, whether it be a locally brewed pint or a signature cocktail-for those who don’t drink, there’s never been more options for non-alcoholic drinks, with many venues providing a wide range of alcohol-free drinks.

    Spreading the word: Many venues depend on word-of-mouth support to promote their events. Without the substantial marketing budgets of larger venues, it is crucial to actively express your support for your favourite independent venues. Sharing photos online and telling your friends about your favourite shows at local independent venues  boosts their visibility and can act as a vital lifeline for these independent establishments.

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    Music Sessions for Young People

    by <object object at 0x7fa9ec990580> last modified 26/01/2024 04:36 PM
    Find out more about our 1-2-1/ small group sessions for young people

    Music Sessions for Young People

    by <object object at 0x7fa9ec990580> last modified 26/01/2024 04:36 PM

    Next Gen

    Image Credit: Alastair Brookes

    As part of our Children and Young People's programme we offer one to one or small group (up to three people) music sessions for young people aged 11-25yrs. These sessions are tailored to help young people develop skills, build confidence and support to take their next steps, whether it be to access further music-making provision or to re-engage with the educational system.

    We work with professional music tutors who use a trauma informed approach to support young people to identify the areas they are interested in exploring in the sessions. This could involve anything from learning guitar or piano to recording an original rap track. Tutors facilitate and encourage young people to express themselves in whatever way they feel inspired to.

    ‘I love coming here, it’s a home away from home’ - Feedback, young person, 1-2-1 sessions

    Sessions take part in our fully equipped studio rooms. Our live rooms feature two drum kits, a large electric piano and a collection of bass, electric and acoustic guitars. Our digital studio allows young people to access synthesisers, drum machines and a professional level microphone set up for recording, ideal for vocalists or those interested in music production. Both studios are capable of making high quality recordings which can be shared with the individual (or group) at their request.

    If you are supporting a young person who would benefit from accessing our music provision please contact the Children and Young Peoples team for further information including prices for sessions on info@trinitybristol.org.uk.

    These sessions are supported through funding from NIMBUS Sounds, a partnership between Creative Youth Network (CYN), Aspiration Creation Elevation (ACE), Basement Studios and Trinity Community Arts.

     

    LOGO

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    Coming up: Theatre and dance this Spring

    by sarah last modified 25/01/2024 02:08 PM
    Get involved with theatre and dance at Trinity

    Coming up: Theatre and dance this Spring

    by sarah last modified 25/01/2024 02:08 PM

    We are excited to launch our Spring Theatre and Arts programme at Trinity that offers audiences an exciting exploration of themes around counterculture and alternative lifestyles, queer untold stories, creative play and the power of movement.

    The programme kicks off with Igloo on 16 Feb. Igloo is a non-verbal, playful theatrical experience filled with warmth, sensation and gentle exploration, suitable for babes in arms and pre-schoolers aged 0-3 accompanied by their carers. As part of each performance there will be a facilitated play session. The performance is non-verbal, but the play session contains some words. Audience members will also be given an Igloo picture book and other creative ideas to enable families to continue with creative play at home. Igloo is originally a Travelling Light and Bristol Old Vic co-production. Spaces are very limited, click here to sign up.

    Later in February, on 23 Feb, we have Kill The Cop Inside Your Head, a theatre piece from spoken word and performance artist Subira Joy, exploring their experiences of being targeted by the police as a Black, queer and trans person in the UK. Combining striking visual imagery with powerful language, this new work examines the impact of the police in our communities and how we internalise their role to repress and suppress ourselves into submission. This is a rescheduled event, originally scheduled for November 2023. Click here to get your tickets.

    Full Bloom Festival of dance for and by older people returns to Trinity on 16-17 Mar. Throughout the day, participants can take part in artistic workshops and dance performances including matinee and evening performances showcasing the work of Gerry's Attic Dance Company, a resident dance company who run weekly sessions at The Trinity Centre. Click here to get your tickets.

    Closing out our Spring Theatre and Arts season, we have Roadside on 05 April, a solo theatre show inspired by interviews with roadside dwellers across the South West and drawing on the musical history of this new traveller community, from festivals to free parties, to songs around the fire. Click here to get your tickets for Roadside.

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    Investment in culture for the West country

    by sarah last modified 08/01/2024 03:36 PM
    Trinity are key delivery partners in new South West initiative

    Investment in culture for the West country

    by sarah last modified 08/01/2024 03:36 PM

    Community stakeholders take part in Understory a digital mapping session by Onion Collective and Free Ice Cream. Photo credit: Trinity Community Arts/Alastair Brookes

    A £3.1million investment package has been secured by Mayoral Combined Authority from Arts Council England and match funders to deliver a two-year programme that will open up the creative sector to more diverse talent, to create opportunities for more communities take part and create arts experiences and build a resilient sector that will drive economic growth in the West of England.

    'Culture West' will include the creation of a citizen-led cultural delivery plan for the West of England region in 2024 through our Citizens' Assembly project that we developed in collaboration with St Paul's Carnival and David Jubb (Citizens in Power).

    The Citizens' Assembly pilot took place in 2023 and was funded by the Celeste Gulbenkian UK Branch. As part of the partnership project, we delivered a series of exploratory workshops that included inviting South West residents to take part in sessions. The pilot project has helped shape the delivery for the 2024 project region-wide Citizens' Assembly.

    Alongside the Citizens' Assembly. 'Culture West' will also offer support for creative professionals, mentoring and business advice, commissioning new festivals and offering industry-led skills training. The project will also see the region's schools have increased access to inclusive cultural experiences, with support for museum and theatre visits, artist residencies, and skills sharing.

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    £1m investment means we're one step closer to saving Jacobs Wells

    by sarah last modified 22/12/2023 01:32 AM
    The investment from Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities Community Ownership Fund will help to deliver plans to revive the space

    £1m investment means we're one step closer to saving Jacobs Wells

    by sarah last modified 22/12/2023 01:32 AM
    £1m investment means we're one step closer to saving Jacobs Wells

    Jacobs Wells Baths

    Jacobs Wells Baths

    Amy Hutchings, with the support of Anna Haydock-Wilson, created a bespoke artwork for Jacobs Wells as part of the Fundsurfer appeal. Photo: Alastair Brookes

    Thank you Bristol - we wouldn't have achieved this milestone without you!

    Jacobs Wells – formerly known as Bristol Community Dance Centre in Hotwells – is one step closer to being revived in 2025 following a £1,050,000 grant from The Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities’ (DLUHC) Community Ownership Fund. The investment will help to deliver plans developed in response to a community campaign to transform the derelict space into a vibrant community arts hub.

    Since the start of 2023, the race has been on to save the Grade II listed building following news that Bristol City Council had listed the asset for disposal. Backed by community stakeholders including Hotwells & Cliftonwood Community Association, artists and local councillors, we set out on a mission to raise the funds needed to repair and restore the building.

    "This is another massive step in a hugely ambitious recovery effort and the Trinity Board would like to extend our huge thanks to DLUHC, match funders and supporters for sharing our vision." Trinity Trustee Dr Fidel Meraz

    This latest investment builds on Bristol City Council's 35-year Community Asset Transfer offer to Trinity and ongoing survey work funded by Nisbet Trust and match funders to assess and scope the repairs scheme and undertake emergency measures to stop further damage.

    The grant from DLUHC matches over £400,000 pledged in support of the project from local funders Nisbet Trust, John James Foundation and match funders including individuals who have been donating to an online Fundsurfer appeal.

    The journey so far...

    The Grade II Listed building has sat dormant since 2018 and faced an uncertain future at the start of 2023 when plans to reinstate it as a pool fell through. A petition was launched to save the building by the Hotwells & Cliftonwood Community Association, with the help of Trinity and it was subsequently listed as ‘At Risk’ by SAVE Britain’s Heritage due to its dilapidated condition.

    We are actively progressing detailed surveys to the fabric of the building to assess the building’s condition and viability; this includes essential surveys to scope and cost works to inform decision making and capital-works. Subject to these, Trinity’s vision is to secure an estimated £4 million for a two-phased capital project and bring the building back into use in 2025 as a home for dance and community activity. See more about our plans, here.

    Trinity Trustee, Dr Fidel Meraz who has been working with staff and community supporters to drive the appeal said:

    "We want to take this opportunity to share a heartfelt thank you to all who contributed to the mission so far. From the encouraging letters from residents to the dedicated volunteers who generously shared their time to help campaign to restore the building, your support has been invaluable. We wouldn't have achieved this milestone without each one of you."

    Dan Norris, Metro Mayor who recently visited Jacobs Wells for a behind-the-scenes tour said:

    “Jacobs Wells Baths is full of potential, and I know many local people are really behind getting this building restored and opened again for the benefit of the community. I’m delighted that the hard work of Trinity Community Arts has paid off to secure this cash.

    "As I’ve seen when I looked around, there’s a lot to do to before Hotwells residents can enjoy this facility again, but the potential is amazing. This is another important step on the journey.”

    “Each step in this journey paves the way for the next and this latest grant from DLUHC brings us ever closer to building's revival. Its success is still very much dependent on your support - we invite you to join us and show you care by giving to our Fundsurfer". Emma Harvey, CEO

    Councillor Craig Cheney, Deputy Mayor for Finance, Governance, Performance, and Culture, Bristol City Council said of the news:

    “It was brilliant to see the new artwork at Jacobs Wells Baths last month, after we awarded a 35-year Community Asset Transfer lease in July to bring the Grade II listed site back to life.

    "Congratulations to everyone at Trinity for securing this major £1 million investment in Jacobs Wells Baths. We hope that it will be a giant leap on the journey to delivering a thriving community arts hub.”

    Our CEO Emma Harvey said:

    “The success of a project like this is less about one thing and more about overcoming a series of interconnected challenges - from addressing immediate liabilities and securing funding to galvanising support from local stakeholders, alongside showing that the building has a long-term, viable future.

    “Each step in this journey paves the way for the next and this latest grant from DLUHC brings us ever closer to building's revival. Its success is still very much dependent on your support - we invite you to join us and show you care by giving to our Fundsurfer".

    Read more about the Community Ownership Fund here.

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