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by emma last modified 13/08/2013 12:17 PM

Max's Story

by sarah last modified 04/02/2020 05:04 PM
Max takes part in weekly drum sessions at Trinity, this is his story

Max's Story

by sarah last modified 04/02/2020 05:04 PM
Max's Story

Trinity's Youth Music project Making Tracks

Making Tracks Youth Music

Photo @ Khali Ackford / KoLAB Studios

Max is a young man who has been coming to Trinity off and on for the past year. He started playing the drums at the age of 12 but in recent years had no access to a drum-kit so stopped playing.

Making Tracks has provided Max with weekly lessons, teaching him the rudiments of drumming for the first time and creating opportunities for him to realise songs he had written in his head for years.

“I've never really had the facilities and encouragement to do this before, but I'm making these steps, and although they're not speedy they’re at a pace that I’m comfortable with and I'm really enjoying the journey.” Max

During the course of the year Max has found it easier to retain musical information, and both his confidence and musical ability have improved significantly.

He shows great insight into the value of projects like Making Tracks and the benefits they offer to young people like him who may suffer from anxiety or self-doubt and therefore not push themselves forward: “I think it's important that that's what these places do, they try to encourage people who aren't fully out of their shells or fully know what they want to do, to explore things and just have fun with it, because it shouldn't be a stressful thing, not knowing what you want to do.”

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Lottery celebrations showcasing everyday culture

by sarah last modified 15/01/2020 04:14 PM
Trinity join 40 community arts centres for the national 'Here and Now' Project

Lottery celebrations showcasing everyday culture

by sarah last modified 15/01/2020 04:14 PM
Lottery celebrations showcasing everyday culture

Local residents joined in with a Lullabies workshop at Easton Community Centre

 

Trinity has been selected to be one of 40 community arts centres to take part in Here and Now, a national and local celebration of culture within communities running alongside the National Lottery’s 25 year anniversary.

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'KickStart' your community project

by sarahb last modified 08/01/2020 04:57 PM
Still time to apply to Trinity's Kickstart project and get support to start your community activity

'KickStart' your community project

by sarahb last modified 08/01/2020 04:57 PM
'KickStart' your community project

Bristol Samba meet weekly at Trinity

Gentle Dance group for over 55's meet weekly at Trinity and are supported through the Community Kickstart project. Photo @Khali Ackford

**EXTENDED APPLICATION DEADLINE**

We are offering local residents free usage of our hall spaces and small amounts of funding to start community activities. The initiative is open to groups that are not in receipt of funding and do not have a regular meeting space.

We also want to support those inspired individuals in our communities who have an idea and the passion to start an activity that is lacking in their community or neighbourhood. Examples of activities that we have hosted include dance, art, craft, fitness, tea mornings, gardening and bingo - but we open for many more ideas.

If you live in BS2 or BS5 and have a idea you would like to develop then get in touch with Activities Coordinator Claire Goulding or download an application form

We are what you make us, so #makethespace and #getinvolved

The Community Kickstart project is funded by Awards for All and Power to Change

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Tenisha, aka Miss Tee's Story

by sarah last modified 04/02/2020 05:04 PM
Miss Tee has performed at Harbour Festival and garden party, this is her story

Tenisha, aka Miss Tee's Story

by sarah last modified 04/02/2020 05:04 PM
Tenisha, aka Miss Tee's Story

Making Tracks is an opportunity for young people to learn new skills

Trinity Centre Youth Music Bristol

Photo @ KoLAB Studios

“I just learned to channel my anger, emotions, my energy in a good way, so I could create something I could be proud of... I'm just going to keep following that path of love, loving what I do and loving how I do it and just see where it gets me, coz that’s all I can do.” Miss Tee

Tenisha is a young single parent whose situation has turned around over the last two years with support from Trinity.

From being someone with very little confidence who described herself as ‘a negative person’ Tenisha has used her involvement with Making Tracks to develop a positive approach to life, both personally and professionally.

Her lyric writing, singing, microphone use and music production skills have improved significantly. She has become increasingly independent and her confidence has blossomed, evidenced in her three live performances in front of large crowds this year.

“They (Trinity) showed me I could do more with my music, that I am my music, and to embrace my music. They made me understand that context, and the confidence helped me build it too... It’s a big step for me, and it’s scary too, but they've helped me every step of the way and I'm so grateful... It’s made me more independent and that is making me overcome a lot of other fears. The whole coming out of my shell, being who I really want to be, and doing what I love...”

Tenisha has developed a strong musical relationship with Trinity staff who have challenged and supported her in a way that has encouraged her growth, personally and musically, her self-discipline and self-belief.

Having now joined PRS as an artist in her own right Tenesha’s next steps include producing an EP of original music and releasing it across multiple platforms. She’s also keen to mentor other young people, pushing them forward in a way she feels she was never pushed until now.

“Overall we're incredibly pleased with her. I'm really happy for her because it's going to keep going, it’s not the top of the hill yet, so she will stay involved.” Al Howard,Trinity staff member

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Joan's Story

by sarah last modified 04/02/2020 04:48 PM
Joan has been taking part in music making project Making Tracks

Joan's Story

by sarah last modified 04/02/2020 04:48 PM
Joan's Story

Making Tracks is an opportunity for young people to learn new skills

Photo @ KoLAB Studios

Joan is a young women who has been home schooled. She struggles being around groups of young people but really enjoys the opportunity to play one to one with a music teacher. Joan now plays the bass and until her introduction to Making Tracks mainly played alone.

“Trinity as a whole seems to be a safe space for Joan. She seems quite nervous when I've seen her mix with people outside, but when she is mixing with people inside Trinity she's really open. So I think it's important for her to have a space like that... it really seems to be benefiting her.” Bridget, Trinity music tutor

Having taken part in group sessions at both Basement Studios and ACE where she struggled in integrate with other young participants she was offered one to one bass lessons at Trinity.

“Even though I have a bass at home I like playing music with people, so it's given me an opportunity to play music with people, which then gives me more inspiration to play at home. I’ve definitely been taught a lot that I wouldn't have learned if I just played on my own. I've got a lot more confident with playing music and I feel like I understand my instrument more than I did before.”

Her experience at Trinity has marked a significant improvement in Joan’s musical ability, her confidence and her motivation.

When she started lessons she described herself as playing “only one song on one string of the bass” whereas now she has mastered “a whole playlist of songs”. She has developed a good relationship with her music tutor, who she feels understands her and responds well to her individual needs.

Making Tracks is supported by Youth Music and using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England, as well as support from match funders.

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Making Tracks End of Year Party

by sarah last modified 14/01/2020 10:26 AM
Celebrating another successful year of music making

Making Tracks End of Year Party

by sarah last modified 14/01/2020 10:26 AM
Making Tracks End of Year Party

Trinity Centre Youth Music Programme

 

Making Tracks is a life changing music making project delivered in partnership with Trinity and leading youth providers Basement Studio and ACE.

Making Tracks offers young people who are facing challenging circumstances the opportunity to access music making opportunities. Ranging from 121 music making sessions to opportunities to perform a city-wide festivals (Harbourside, St Paul’s Carnival) to Q&A’s with professional artists. Young people are able to receive support and training bespoke to their needs - so they can take the next step into their future.

"It was interesting to see all the other students performances and it shows how far you can get with Making Tracks. I was pleased to see vegan pizza provided and meet lots of friendly people too." Joan, 15

The end of year celebration event is an opportunity for young people, their parents, careers and friends to celebrate the achievements and hard work of everyone who has taken part in Making Tracks over the year.

Taking place in Trinity's main hall the evening included performances from some of the young people who take part in the project. Performers included Chloe Thorn (Basement Studio), Miss Tee (Trinity), Sam Neal (Trinity) and Tom Meadley (Trinity).

The celebration is also an opportunity to network/ meet others who take part in the Making Tracks project as well as other young people from across the city. We were delighted to welcome 15 young people from Hartcliffe who came along with their youth workers to experience more creative opportunities in the city, joining 60+ others for the evenings activities.

Community members who take part in activity at Trinity also had an opportunity to showcase their talents. Flash-mob style dance interventions came from some of the young women who took part in the Let Us Dance project and liver music was performed by members of WECIL Collective,  whose members attend regular group music sessions with tutors at Trinity.

Making Tracks is supported by Youth Music and using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England, as well as support from match funders.

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Profile: Roxana Vilk

by sarah last modified 03/12/2019 01:48 PM
Read about resident artist, Roxana, and her Trinity journey

Profile: Roxana Vilk

by sarah last modified 03/12/2019 01:48 PM
Profile: Roxana Vilk

Trinity's IGNiTE programme of theatre and dance

 

Roxana is a British-Iranian artist with a background in physical theatre, film and music. In 2018 Roxana Vilk moved to Bristol from Scotland and started teaching English to refugee women at the Malcolm X Centre. After attending a drop-in for international parents at her son's school, she was inspired to use lullabies to bring communities together. Soon after this, Roxana applied to become an IGNiTE resident

“When I walked into Trinity I thought ‘Ok, this is home" Roxana Vilk

Our community-led approach is what made her chose IGNiTE over other residencies that were available in the area. Joining us gave her a sense of grounding that helped her kick-start her artistic work in Bristol. During her four months with us, she grew her idea from “seed” stage to full blown project.

Roxana developed “Lullabies” together with local communities by collecting, recording and sharing songs from the many cultures in Bristol. Here she was filmed by the BBC during a workshop at Easton Community Centre, delivered in partnership with Up Our Street.

The Trinity team members supported Roxana with project planning, producing and time management guidance. This supported her growth as an artist. Roxana also feels like Trinity’s networks and connections benefited her project. The IGNiTE residency also allowed Roxana to develop new skills and take artistic risks, allowing her to "get out of her comfort zone".

“There’s a deep respect for Trinity amongst artists, and an awareness that there is integrity in any work that is supported by the venue.”

With Trinity's support Roxana is continuing to develop “Lullabies” gathering songs with Bristol-based communities and running workshops culminating a “Lullabies” showcase at Trinity in 2020.

Finally, Roxana feels like IGNiTE really benefit marginalised communities in Bristol. Several people at the Trinity sharing said they had never attended a show or been involved in one before because opportunities are usually not communicated to them. Roxana believes the local engagement work Trinity does, makes it the most distinctive community arts provider in the area.

“If the Arts Council is all about prioritising access to the arts, supporting Trinity and more specifically the IGNiTE programme is a no brainer.”

About IGNiTE

IGNiTE is Trinity's in house programme of world-class, innovative theatre and dance about issues that matter to people now, starting conversations and sparking debate. IGNiTE is supported using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England and by Bristol City Council.



Photo credits @ Alexa Ledecky www.alexaledecky.com

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Let Us Dance

by sarahb last modified 30/09/2019 01:43 PM
Young Dancers take over Arnolfini this Autumn

Let Us Dance

by sarahb last modified 30/09/2019 01:43 PM
Let Us Dance

'Let Us Dance' project

Hype perform on the Trinity stage at Harbourside Festival 2019. Photo Alastair Brookes

Young female street dancers will be taking over Arnolfini as part of the Trinity supported 'Let Us Dance' project that runs alongside Arnolfini's 'Still I Rise' exhibition.

Running in the gallery space every Sunday, until Dec 15, 'Let Us Dance' is a celebration of young women. Street dancing teenagers, enter the gallery space, dance to soundtracks from their mobile phones playing their choice of songs and then leave the space. This is a simple act of resistance, defiance and tremendous skill.

Trinity have been working with Bristol-based dance groups to invite young women aged 13-19 to get involved. Some of the groups taking part already have strong connections with Trinity; HYPE meet weekly at Trinity and are supported by Trinity's Community Kick Start initiative and Rise Youth Dance have performed their annual showcase at Trinity. Also performing are BS13 / Storm who took part in Trinity's Dances Stage at Bristol Harbourside Festival last July.

Head down to Arnolfini every Sunday between 1pm and 4pm and you might just catch one of the vibrant surprise performances of young women taking ownership of a space they are usually denied.

Let Us Dance is presented by Arnolfini, with the support of Trinity Centre.

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Community Family Day

by sarahb last modified 25/09/2019 03:56 PM
Check out the photo highlights

Community Family Day

by sarahb last modified 25/09/2019 03:56 PM
Community Family Day

Family Days are for the local community to come together and enjoy Trinity's garden

 

This Summer local families came along to our new Community Family Days in the Garden - and it was brilliant.

"I got to try fire lighting for the first time. It was really hard at first but then I managed to do it! I got to toast 5 marshmallows for me and my brother, so yummy!"

The sessions are an opportunity for local children aged 0-12 and their families and carers to take part in nature based play activities. Inspired by forest school our wonderful garden team support children to find out more about traditional heritage crafts - from fire lighting to natural sculpting to foraging alongside finding our more about organic growing.

Would you like to get involved with the garden? Click here to find out about opportunities for local schools, volunteering opportunities and information about taking part in our Community Kickstart project.

The Community Family Day is supported by funding through BBC Children in Need

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New 'Digs' at Trinity

by sarahb last modified 19/08/2019 03:57 PM
Find out more about works to provide more community meeting and office space

New 'Digs' at Trinity

by sarahb last modified 19/08/2019 03:57 PM

The Trinity Digs project will enable Trinity to host and support more community activity at the centre. Photo Paul Blakemore

We have been awarded a grant of £231,818 from Power to Change to deliver ‘The Trinity Digs Project’ to carry out capital improvements to the site so can host and support more community activity at the centre.

“We want to make sure Trinity’s ongoing development continues to be shaped and informed by those who use it. As part of the project we’ll be running a community activity programme so that people can get involved, have their say and kick-start their own ideas. More news on this coming soon - watch this space” Glyn Everett, Chair of Trustees and local resident

The project will install customised container-units on site, to provide affordable, low-cost, sustainable hot-desk space as a base for community partners, emerging artists and local start-ups. Improvements to the ‘Graffiti Room’ will also mean more activities can be hosted, such as neighbourhood meetings, rehearsals and workshops.

Match funding has been generously provided from local funders including The Nisbet Trust, who have donated £20,053 toward the capital project, alongside generous donations from members of the public. A £25,000 individual gift and a grant of £7,624 from the Postcode Local Trust to improve accessibility to our community garden.

Alongside the capital works we will be helping support people who have ideas within the community to get involved and set up their own initiatives through the Community Kick Start Project. We are particularly interested in working with small voluntary and residents groups with limited or no budget to support getting new ideas off the ground.

Set up to grow and support community businesses in England, Power to Change provides grants to community businesses run by and for the local community. Our aim through the Trinity Dig’s Project is to continue to invest in the Trinity Centre as a key cultural and community asset, and to build a varied and sustainable participatory community arts programme, that reflects the interests of Bristol’s diverse communities and cultures.

View the Tinity Digs plans on www.bristol.gov.uk - search planning ref no 12/03943/F Past works 2013

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The Summer Sessions were a blast.

by sarahb last modified 10/09/2019 08:49 AM
Highlights from this years Making Tracks summer sessions

The Summer Sessions were a blast.

by sarahb last modified 10/09/2019 08:49 AM
The Summer Sessions were a blast.

Summer Sessions are an opportunity for young people to meet other musicians

 

Over two days young people, who take part in the Making Tracks youth music project, came together to explore new musical possibilities and gain industry insights.

Following on the success of last years sessions we invited Access Creative College back to deliver workshops in music production. This year was all about experimental sound and students went around the building, recorded found sounds that were then sampled and then used to create unique sounding beats.

We also invited Ngaio and Kayla Painter from Bristol based Saffron Records, who work to create more representation of women in the music industry, down. They hosted two motivational discussion based workshops exploring the current roles and opportunities available to women within the music industry.

"Coming here has given me something to look forward to and has helped me with my mental health especially interacting with others. It helps me have a voice." 
Kevin, Making Tracks Participant

Trinity tutors were also on hand to lead sessions in song writing and recording alongside supporting young people during the final live performances. 

Over the two days 28 young people came along – some coming "to meet other musicians and collaborate" and others well,  "because music is life".

These sessions form just part of the many music making opportunities available to young people as part of the Youth Music funded Making Tracks project.

If you are a young person or know a young person who would like to take part in the Making Tracks project then get in touch with Dave Thomas, Trinity’s Youth Activities Manager.

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Garden update, Summer 2019

by emma last modified 07/08/2019 02:28 PM
Take a look at what's on in our community garden

Garden update, Summer 2019

by emma last modified 07/08/2019 02:28 PM
Garden update, Summer 2019

Gardening day with AHMM and upcoming summer activities

With Summer in full flow, our new Community Activities Co-ordinator Claire along with her assistant Fleur have been busy making the garden ship shape.

 

We’ve received a massive help from Allford Hall Monaghan Morris (AHMM) architecture practice who, not only kindly donated funds to fix the poly-tunnel, but also came down for a corporate volunteer day to help repair it and help with some much needed gardening.

The day was massively successful and the garden is looking fantastic because of their donation and visit!

The garden team have also been busy on working out the new programme for the garden - one of the first events to get back off the ground is our Monthly Garden Volunteer Days.

These will run every last Saturday of the month from 11am till 2:30pm starting on the 28th of September.

Bring a packed lunch and we’ll provide everything else, from tea and cake to practical information about organic growing.

For more information please check out our events page.

We are also developing a new partnerships with St Paul’s Nursery & Children's Centre, Julian House Domestic Abuse Children's Service, Barton Hill Academy, Community Kitchen and Age UK amongst other things - watch this space for more information about our developing programme of activities.

If you have any suggestions about what you’d like to see, want to find out more about how to get involved or our corporate volunteer days pop an e-mail to Claire or give us a call on 0117 9351200

We're what you make us so get involved! #MaketheSpace.

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Trinity at Harbour Festival

by emma last modified 19/08/2019 03:53 PM
Trinity curated the Bristol Dances Stage @Harbour Festival 2019

Trinity at Harbour Festival

by emma last modified 19/08/2019 03:53 PM
Trinity at Harbour Festival

Bristol Dance Stage 2019

A roundup of images from the Bristol Dances Stage at Harbour Festival 2019, curated by Trinity's IGNiTE arts programming team.

All images © Alastair Brookes - KoLAB Studios

gerrys

This was the first year Trinity programmed the Festival’s dynamic dance stage. We wanted to give a platform to and showcase the work of some of Bristol’s diverse dance communities.

hype

Well done to everyone who performed on the day - everyone smashed it! Big shout out goes to Trinity's resident dance troupe Hype Dance who wowed everyone with their energetic performance.

kabbo

Well done to everyone who took part. The audience was visibly impressed by the stellar performances and everyone was getting into the positive vibes of the day.

mermaids

The stage returned to Millennium Square for its second year, with curation this year by Trinity - we were proud to offer the city an incredible programme featuring everything from street dance to swing!

carnival dance

We hope everyone enjoyed our programme - please get in touch with your images and comments from the day!

dancing crowd

We're what you make us so get involved! #MaketheSpace.

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Making Tracks at Harbour Festival

by emma last modified 19/08/2019 02:43 PM
Young people performing live at Bristol's Harbour Festival 2019

Making Tracks at Harbour Festival

by emma last modified 19/08/2019 02:43 PM
Making Tracks at Harbour Festival

Chel from ACE performing at Harbour Festival, 2019 - © Alastair Brookes - KoLAB Studios

Young performers from the Making Tracks project took part in a showcase slot at this year’s Bristol Harbour Festival.

A total of six artists performed in just over an hour as part of the Trinity curated, ‘Bristol Dances’ stage located in Millennium Square. These included: Delocx (ACE) Miss Tee (Trinity) Kevin McKechnie (Trinity) Sam Neal (Trinity) Xyzelle (ACE) Chel (ACE)

This year’s youth music performances proved to be a resounding success and we are all really proud of all our young people who took part. Each artist brought their own unique style and flair to the occasion.

Delocx performed 3 original streetwise hip-hop tracks engaging the crowd with confident stage banter and swagger all topped off with thought provoking lyrical content.

Miss Tee performed 2 original tracks produced at Trinity. Although she was admittedly / visibly nervous Miss Tee managed to keep her composure and the crowd were right behind her all the way.

Kev McKechnie came out and proved his soulful pop voice could win over any crowd as he belted out 2 classics from Lewis Capaldi (Hold Me While You Wait) and John Legend (All of Me).

Trinity Youth Ambassador, Sam Neal wowed the ever growing crowd with a total of 4 songs. 3 original tracks and 1 cover, ‘Wonderwall’ by Oasis. His strummed acoustic singer songwriter stylings certainly managed to get toes tapping and heads nodding.

Xyzelle performed 2 original tracks which proved to be a hit with the audience as the bass drops got heavy and the sass levels rocketed.

Chel finished off a triumphant hour of music by performing 2 uptempo original tracks that had the crowd moving to the perfect blend of summer beats and pop hooks.

Well done to you all - you smashed it!

Special thanks to Roseanna, Liz and Alexa at Trinity and all the crew for providing our young people the opportunity to perform on the ‘Bristol Dances’ and ensuring the smooth running of an absolutely fantastic event!

Making Tracks is a Youth Music funded collaborative partnership project between Trinity, ACE and Basement.


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Don't Miss These Making Tracks Performances

by sarahb last modified 05/07/2019 12:00 PM
Catch young people from our music making project across Bristol this summer

Don't Miss These Making Tracks Performances

by sarahb last modified 05/07/2019 12:00 PM
Don't Miss These Making Tracks Performances

Miss Tee performs during Trinity Garden Party

Young people performed at this years Trinity Garden party - you can catch more performances across Bristol this summer. Photo @Alexa Ledecky

Where you can find Making Tracks performances this Summer:

Bristol is always buzzing with Festivals over the Summer so it is great that the Making Tracks partners have teamed up with the three leading festivals to provide opportunities for young people to showcase their talents.

St. Paul's Carnival - Sat July 6th

Youth Music 'Making Tracks' partners ACE have are managing the Unity Stage at this years St Paul's Carnival. St Paul's Carnival is one of Bristol's seminal events attracting a huge crowd across the day. Young people aged 12- 21 will have a 30min slots to perform on the stage presenting an array of talents spanning vocal and DJ sets.

Bristol Pride - Sat 13th July

Making Tracks partners Basement Studios will be managing the 'open mic sessions' at this years Bristol Pride Celebrations on the Downs int dedicated 'youth area'. Expect open mic performances from young people across the day.

Bristol Harbourfest - Sat 20th July, 2pm-3pm, Millennium Square

Trinity Centre are proud to be hosting the Trinity Presents: Bristol Dances stage at this years harbour festival. Harbourfestival is attended by over 300,000 so this is a fantastic opportunity for young people to showcase their talents. Performers on the day include: Miss Tee and Kevin McKechnie.

Good luck to everyone performing!

Making Tracks is supported by Youth Music and using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England, as well as support from match funders.

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Benjamin Zephaniah Q&A

by sarahb last modified 29/05/2019 10:24 AM
Poet, writer, musician, actor met young people from Making Tracks

Benjamin Zephaniah Q&A

by sarahb last modified 29/05/2019 10:24 AM
Benjamin Zephaniah Q&A

Benjamin Zephaniah meets young people from Making Tracks

Benjamin Zephaniah poses with young people from Making Tracks, Dave Thomas, Trinity Youth Activities Manager, Roseanna Dias, Assistant Producer and Emma Harvey, Trinity CEO. Photo @Khali Ackford

Benjamin Zephaniah: Poet, writer, musician, actor, Rastafarian and proud vegan, anarchist and political campaigner / activist kindly agreed to take part in an exclusive industry insight session designed to better integrate Trinity’s live event programme with our in house music training provision.

Funded by Youth Music and partner funders, ‘Making Tracks’, is a dynamic city wide partnership between Trinity, Basement studios and Aspiration, Creation and Elevation (ACE) providing 121, small group music sessions, workshops and performance opportunities to young people in challenging circumstances. The focus of this provision is to build confidence, develop and support talented young musicians providing them with realistic progression routes leading them to reengage back in to education, work, tapprenticeship or meaningful activity.

"If you want to be a musician, artist or poet you need to act and think like a musician, artist or poet. Just do it." Benjamin Zephaniah

Benjamin was in good spirits and smiling broadly. After a brief informal meet and greet / book signing session with 12 students he hopped up on to Trinity’s main stage to join his band, The Revolutionary Minds, finishing off the soundcheck in preparation for the evenings performance. Shortly afterwards Benjamin rejoined our students and spent well over an hour of his own free time to answer questions providing the young people we work with a rare, informative and truly inspirational insight into his life and professional working methods.

From reminiscing about his early years, as a small child disinterested in the usual kids stuff like toys and action figures he would spend hours upon hours amusing himself quietly in the corner, ‘playing with words’, as he describes it. In fact, he became so obsessed by words and the different the ways in which they can be moulded, shaped and misinterpreted depending on context, that his worried mum took him to a psychiatrist at the tender age of 7!

Benjamin spent over 1 hour chatting with young people, answering questions and sharing his story. Photo @Khali Ackford

It wasn’t too long after that his burgeoning rebel spirit coupled with severe dyslexia got him into all kinds of scrapes, which, unfortunately led to him being expelled from school and placed into a pupil referral unit, in which, at that time, the teachers would regularly punish the children and shamefully tell him he would never achieve anything in life. As he got older, his behaviour worsened and he ended up in a Borstal prison for young offenders. It was here that he had a lot of time to think about his life and began to change his ways. Determined to prove the prison officers who taunted him by saying he would be back behind bars within 3 months wrong, he set about changing course in order to focus more seriously on his poetry and performance.

"I could have hung out with these cats all night. I love them. I hope they all stay creative. We need to hear them." Benjamin Zephaniah

He regaled us with often hilarious anecdotes and hair raising tales of performing at Northern miners strike benefit gigs in the early 80s. He talked about being confronted by shocking levels of racism, ignorance and bigotry through to receiving praise from Nelson Mandela to nostalgic recollection of an old much admired tutor who taught him how to build and deconstruct a car engine, for which he is still grateful.

Benjamin chats with Dave Thomas, Trinity Youth Activities Manager and young people from Making Tracks. Photo @Khali Ackford

Benjamin’s main piece of advice to our music students wanting to progress within the music industry was to, ‘think for yourselves’, he could not stress enough how important this is. He also said that despite sounding cliched, it is vital to ‘believe in yourself. If you want to be a musician, artist or poet you need to act and think like a musician, artist or poet. Just do it.’, he enthused. He also went on to talk in great detail about the importance of, ‘understanding how the industry works’, surrounding yourself with the right people (managers / band members, etc) his approach and methods to songwriting, ways to counter creative block and last but by no means least, the ritual of ensuring his teeth are thoroughly cleaned before each and every live / public performance!

This was a truly exceptional and inspirational industry insight and on behalf of all at Trinity, Making Tracks and our partners ACE and Basement, we would like to once again thank Benjamin, his management, band, live engineer and especially his booking agent for helping to make this incredible opportunity a reality.

Written by Dave Thomas, Trinity Youth Activities Manager

 

Making Tracks is supported by Youth Music and using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England.

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Making Tracks Showcase

by sarahb last modified 15/05/2019 02:26 PM
Young people from Making tracks to play at this years Garden Party

Making Tracks Showcase

by sarahb last modified 15/05/2019 02:26 PM
Making Tracks Showcase

Area of Effect will play on the Making Tracks stage

Area of Effect play Garden Party in 2018 photo @Jessica Bartolini

Garden Party is one of our most popular events - each year we programme family friendly workshops and some of Bristol and the South West's best bands and DJ's.

Our Making Tracks Showcase is an opportunity for young people, from our music making project, to showcase their talent to a 3,000 person Garden Party audience! The Showcase will be on the main stage from 12:00 - 12:30 then, in the main hall from 3pm - 6pm.

Students will join an awesome lineup including Sam Binga,  Rider Shafiue, Dutchie + Indra and Almatic.

We wish them all the luck x

Singer-songwriter Holly Miller performing in Making Tracks Christmas Showcase in 2018

Holly Miller

Holly has been attending the Making Tracks programme for 8 months and has used this time to hone her singer-songwriter craft to create intimate acoustic songs covering universal themes of love, loss and life.

Miss Tee is prime for a summer hit, watch out for her.

Miss Tee

Miss Tee is a multi skilled singer, songwriter and producer who has progressed in leaps and bounds through taking part with our Making Tracks programme, developing her awesome writing capabilities and finding her own distinctive sound.

Sam Neal has been honing his distinctive sound during 121 sessions at Trinity

Sam Neal

Sam Neal is a Making Tracks veteran. This uplifting singer-songwriter's soulful summer sounds are guaranteed to get the crowd moving.

Meghan

Meghan is a multi-discipline drummer / singer. As a performer she is a ball of energy, that can't be ignored - whether it's rocking out on her drum kit or serving fierce vocals Meghan always packs a punch.

Rob B

Rob proves it's never to late to pursue your passion. Having joined 18 months ago his Drum and Bass DJ stylings have thrived producing a mature sound. Area of Effect - Making their return to the Trinity, Garden Party stage Area's of Effect are a young Indie-Rock band - with oodles of talent and buckets of energy.

Making Tracks is a collaborative partnership between Trinity, ACE and Basement Studios. Making Tracks is supported by Youth Music and using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England.


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Lullabies From Across The City

by sarahb last modified 25/09/2019 12:48 PM
A photo recap of IGNiTE Artist Resident Roxana Vilk’s workshop and sharing

Lullabies From Across The City

by sarahb last modified 25/09/2019 12:48 PM
Lullabies From Across The City

A photo recap of IGNiTE Artist Resident Roxana Vilk’s workshop and sharing

In early April, we welcomed Roxana Vilk and her creative team to Trinity for a workshop and sharing of her new piece Lullabies. Roxana is one of the four artist residents we have been supporting this year as part of our IGNiTE programme. During her time with us, she has worked on gathering and showcasing traditional lullabies from the diversity of cultures that have come to call Bristol home.

Roxana (far right) and Lullabies producer Katy Noakes (far left) surrounded by children from the Rosemary Nursery @ Alexa Ledecky

Trinity neighbours Rosemary Nursery came along for a workshop in the afternoon. They were welcomed in a cosy space that really reflected the warm and intimate feel of the Lullabies project. The children and carers sat comfortably on colourful cushions and carpets and watched an audio-visual piece that showcases the Lullabies gathered by Roxana and her team.

The Lullabies rickshaw created by Designer Ruth Ramsay @ Alexa Ledecky

They then learnt to sing a Somalian lullaby with two project participants before having their photo taken on the Lullabies rickshaw. The rickshaw was created by Designer Ruth Ramsay with the idea to involve further communities by cycling around more cities to gathering more lullabies.

Trinity Engagement Office Edson Burton reading his poem amongst an audience of adults and children @ Alexa Ledecky

The workshop was followed by an evening sharing attended by a larger, mainly adult audience. The audio-visual piece was screened again and followed by a live Kurdish lullaby singing and a poem reading.

Adults and children interact after the screening and live performances before a Q£A with the Lullabies creative team @ Alexa Ledecky

It felt particularly special and soothing to have children and adults come together as part of the sharing. During the feedback session, an audience member said: “Loved having kids around made it beautifully relaxed, comforting and accessible”.

Lullaby contributors serve home made Somalian food to audience members @ Alexa Ledecky

Everyone was able to enjoy freshly cooked Somalian food as part of the sharing, which was kindly prepared and served by local project participants. This brought a particularly heart warming touch to the evening and allowed everyone to engage in informal conversations.

Two audience members sit with colourful pieces of bunting and pens on their knees @ Alexa Ledecky

As well as discussing the project with Roxana and her team in a Q&A, the audience could give written feedback about the sharing, of which: “Beautiful songs, images, words and feelings. Thank you to all who shared. It has inspired me to explore my own heritage through song” and “So much love down the generations. Singing of fears and making them less”.

The IGNiTE and Lullabies teams pose together in front of the Rickshaw @ Alexa Ledecky

Read more about the Lullabies project on Roxana’s website and about our other artists in resident including Ania Varez, Viki Browne and Vicki Hearne.

About IGNiTE

IGNiTE is Trinity's in house programme of world-class, innovative theatre and dance about issues that matter to people now, starting conversations and sparking debate. IGNiTE is supported using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England and by Bristol City Council.

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Come Dance at Rent Party

by sarahb last modified 17/04/2019 12:49 PM
Read Maya's latest blog on our IGNiTE performances and workshops

Come Dance at Rent Party

by sarahb last modified 17/04/2019 12:49 PM

Darren Pritchard’s Rent Party was programmed as part of our IGNiTE theatre and dance Spring Season.

Maya Ilogu, aspiring actor and Bristol resident has been blogging about coming along to our IGNiTE performances and workshops this Spring. Read her latest instalment on Darren Pritchard’s Rent Party, that we like to call ‘come dance at Rent Party, even though you’ve not done this type of thing before’.

Over to Maya:

On the 16th March I attended both the workshop and performance of Rent Party. When I arrived I went straight into the main theatre; which was where the workshop was being held.

"As a person of colour living in the UK the show was relatable and they talked about a lot of issues in the UK"

During the workshop I learnt some choreography which I found out was going to be a part of the performance. This is something I didn’t expect to be doing and I don’t have a lot of experience but it was really fun to learn and to be a part of. We learnt the choreography step by step and rehearsed with the performers. The performers were doing it with us and so we had someone to follow if we were unsure of the steps. It was all fun and not taken serious. We had to keep the fact that we are going to be a part of the performance a secret to make it look like a flash mob.

I really liked the choreography - it wasn’t too complicated and was fun to learn and do. we went out to the main entrance just before the show was about to start. The performance began; it was set out like a rent party, party games, music and dancing which meant you couldn’t help but want to join in.

In the show they each told their own story and experiences of growing up in the UK as a person of colour and the issues they had to overcome. We were given play money which we would give to the performer we thought deserved the money at the end.

The show in general was inspiring and gave me motivation to get to where I want to be. Something I really like about the performance was that it was really energetic, fun and everyone could get involve. As a person of colour living in the UK the show was relatable and they talked about a lot of issues in the UK but they didn’t always say them in a serious way which meant they kept to the theme of their performance.

This performance was appealing to everyone and was nothing like I had ever seen before. Before I came to the workshop and performance I didn’t know what to expect other than it was going to have a party vibe and there was going to be music and dance. So I was excited to see what was going to happen.

From a young person’s perspective, who wants to get into acting and performance, it was great to take part in and learn from. I learnt new choreography and gained confidence in performing infront of others. I got a better understanding of different types of performances.

You can read more of Maya's blogs over here.

IGNiTE is supported using public funding by Bristol City Council and by the National Lottery through Arts Council England

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Spring Highlights

by sarahb last modified 25/09/2019 11:32 AM
Looking back at IGNiTE 2019

Spring Highlights

by sarahb last modified 25/09/2019 11:32 AM
Spring Highlights

Roxana Vilk's 'Lullabies' explored heritage migration and identity

Scottee's workshop explored making art about 'issues'. Photo Alexa Ledecky

Our Spring 2019 season of theatre and dance presented innovative artists who spoke from the heart and asked: How do we strip away the layers of expectation placed on us by society to find the truest version of ourselves?

Shows included: Fat Blokes from Scottee; Confessions of a Cockney Temple Dancer by Shane Shambhu; Rent Party by Darren Pritchard Dance; Windows of Displacement by Toussaint To Move.

All shows included ways for audiences to get involved, from Scottee's workshop Getting Things Off Your Chest to Rent Party's post show disco.

We also welcome and supported four IGNiTE artists in residence -Ania Varez developed and shared her project 'Guayabo' (Venezuelan slang for 'heartbreak').  Read her thoughts on taking the project to Spill festival and an honest and brave interview about the reasons and importance of the project with the BBC online.

Vicki Hearne, creative director of Untold Dance Theatre an all female intergenerational company, created a new piece ‘Practically Perfect’, a project that focused on the idea of perfectionism, the journey to strive for this unattainable goal and how this affects women in particular.

Audiences take a short break during Roxana Vilk's sharing of Lullabies. Photo Alexa Ledecky

Roxana Vilk's  'Lullabies' explored heritage migration and identity though collecting lullabies sung to children by families and parents across Bristol.

Sharing Hyper Fem - Viki Brown. Photo Khali Ackford

Viki Browne's 'Hyper Fem' asked whether the performance of femininity through Drag can be as powerful, political or subversive when performed on a female identifying body.

IGNiTE is programmed in collaboration with our Programming Forum.The forum is made up of members of the communities who regularly use Trinity and they help advise our programme.

IGNiTE is supported using public funding by Bristol City Council and by the National Lottery through Arts Council England

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