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Music Sessions for Young People

by <object object at 0x7f01454ee580> last modified 26/01/2024 04:36 PM
Find out more about our 1-2-1/ small group sessions for young people

Music Sessions for Young People

by <object object at 0x7f01454ee580> last modified 26/01/2024 04:36 PM

Next Gen

Image Credit: Alastair Brookes

As part of our Children and Young People's programme we offer one to one or small group (up to three people) music sessions for young people aged 11-25yrs. These sessions are tailored to help young people develop skills, build confidence and support to take their next steps, whether it be to access further music-making provision or to re-engage with the educational system.

We work with professional music tutors who use a trauma informed approach to support young people to identify the areas they are interested in exploring in the sessions. This could involve anything from learning guitar or piano to recording an original rap track. Tutors facilitate and encourage young people to express themselves in whatever way they feel inspired to.

‘I love coming here, it’s a home away from home’ - Feedback, young person, 1-2-1 sessions

Sessions take part in our fully equipped studio rooms. Our live rooms feature two drum kits, a large electric piano and a collection of bass, electric and acoustic guitars. Our digital studio allows young people to access synthesisers, drum machines and a professional level microphone set up for recording, ideal for vocalists or those interested in music production. Both studios are capable of making high quality recordings which can be shared with the individual (or group) at their request.

If you are supporting a young person who would benefit from accessing our music provision please contact the Children and Young Peoples team for further information including prices for sessions on info@trinitybristol.org.uk.

These sessions are supported through funding from NIMBUS Sounds, a partnership between Creative Youth Network (CYN), Aspiration Creation Elevation (ACE), Basement Studios and Trinity Community Arts.

 

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Coming up: Theatre and dance this Spring

by sarah last modified 25/01/2024 02:08 PM
Get involved with theatre and dance at Trinity

Coming up: Theatre and dance this Spring

by sarah last modified 25/01/2024 02:08 PM

We are excited to launch our Spring Theatre and Arts programme at Trinity that offers audiences an exciting exploration of themes around counterculture and alternative lifestyles, queer untold stories, creative play and the power of movement.

The programme kicks off with Igloo on 16 Feb. Igloo is a non-verbal, playful theatrical experience filled with warmth, sensation and gentle exploration, suitable for babes in arms and pre-schoolers aged 0-3 accompanied by their carers. As part of each performance there will be a facilitated play session. The performance is non-verbal, but the play session contains some words. Audience members will also be given an Igloo picture book and other creative ideas to enable families to continue with creative play at home. Igloo is originally a Travelling Light and Bristol Old Vic co-production. Spaces are very limited, click here to sign up.

Later in February, on 23 Feb, we have Kill The Cop Inside Your Head, a theatre piece from spoken word and performance artist Subira Joy, exploring their experiences of being targeted by the police as a Black, queer and trans person in the UK. Combining striking visual imagery with powerful language, this new work examines the impact of the police in our communities and how we internalise their role to repress and suppress ourselves into submission. This is a rescheduled event, originally scheduled for November 2023. Click here to get your tickets.

Full Bloom Festival of dance for and by older people returns to Trinity on 16-17 Mar. Throughout the day, participants can take part in artistic workshops and dance performances including matinee and evening performances showcasing the work of Gerry's Attic Dance Company, a resident dance company who run weekly sessions at The Trinity Centre. Click here to get your tickets.

Closing out our Spring Theatre and Arts season, we have Roadside on 05 April, a solo theatre show inspired by interviews with roadside dwellers across the South West and drawing on the musical history of this new traveller community, from festivals to free parties, to songs around the fire. Click here to get your tickets for Roadside.

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Investment in culture for the West country

by sarah last modified 08/01/2024 03:36 PM
Trinity are key delivery partners in new South West initiative

Investment in culture for the West country

by sarah last modified 08/01/2024 03:36 PM

Community stakeholders take part in Understory a digital mapping session by Onion Collective and Free Ice Cream. Photo credit: Trinity Community Arts/Alastair Brookes

A £3.1million investment package has been secured by Mayoral Combined Authority from Arts Council England and match funders to deliver a two-year programme that will open up the creative sector to more diverse talent, to create opportunities for more communities take part and create arts experiences and build a resilient sector that will drive economic growth in the West of England.

'Culture West' will include the creation of a citizen-led cultural delivery plan for the West of England region in 2024 through our Citizens' Assembly project that we developed in collaboration with St Paul's Carnival and David Jubb (Citizens in Power).

The Citizens' Assembly pilot took place in 2023 and was funded by the Celeste Gulbenkian UK Branch. As part of the partnership project, we delivered a series of exploratory workshops that included inviting South West residents to take part in sessions. The pilot project has helped shape the delivery for the 2024 project region-wide Citizens' Assembly.

Alongside the Citizens' Assembly. 'Culture West' will also offer support for creative professionals, mentoring and business advice, commissioning new festivals and offering industry-led skills training. The project will also see the region's schools have increased access to inclusive cultural experiences, with support for museum and theatre visits, artist residencies, and skills sharing.

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£1m investment means we're one step closer to saving Jacobs Wells

by sarah last modified 22/12/2023 01:32 AM
The investment from Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities Community Ownership Fund will help to deliver plans to revive the space

£1m investment means we're one step closer to saving Jacobs Wells

by sarah last modified 22/12/2023 01:32 AM
£1m investment means we're one step closer to saving Jacobs Wells

Jacobs Wells Baths

Jacobs Wells Baths

Amy Hutchings, with the support of Anna Haydock-Wilson, created a bespoke artwork for Jacobs Wells as part of the Fundsurfer appeal. Photo: Alastair Brookes

Thank you Bristol - we wouldn't have achieved this milestone without you!

Jacobs Wells – formerly known as Bristol Community Dance Centre in Hotwells – is one step closer to being revived in 2025 following a £1,050,000 grant from The Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities’ (DLUHC) Community Ownership Fund. The investment will help to deliver plans developed in response to a community campaign to transform the derelict space into a vibrant community arts hub.

Since the start of 2023, the race has been on to save the Grade II listed building following news that Bristol City Council had listed the asset for disposal. Backed by community stakeholders including Hotwells & Cliftonwood Community Association, artists and local councillors, we set out on a mission to raise the funds needed to repair and restore the building.

"This is another massive step in a hugely ambitious recovery effort and the Trinity Board would like to extend our huge thanks to DLUHC, match funders and supporters for sharing our vision." Trinity Trustee Dr Fidel Meraz

This latest investment builds on Bristol City Council's 35-year Community Asset Transfer offer to Trinity and ongoing survey work funded by Nisbet Trust and match funders to assess and scope the repairs scheme and undertake emergency measures to stop further damage.

The grant from DLUHC matches over £400,000 pledged in support of the project from local funders Nisbet Trust, John James Foundation and match funders including individuals who have been donating to an online Fundsurfer appeal.

The journey so far...

The Grade II Listed building has sat dormant since 2018 and faced an uncertain future at the start of 2023 when plans to reinstate it as a pool fell through. A petition was launched to save the building by the Hotwells & Cliftonwood Community Association, with the help of Trinity and it was subsequently listed as ‘At Risk’ by SAVE Britain’s Heritage due to its dilapidated condition.

We are actively progressing detailed surveys to the fabric of the building to assess the building’s condition and viability; this includes essential surveys to scope and cost works to inform decision making and capital-works. Subject to these, Trinity’s vision is to secure an estimated £4 million for a two-phased capital project and bring the building back into use in 2025 as a home for dance and community activity. See more about our plans, here.

Trinity Trustee, Dr Fidel Meraz who has been working with staff and community supporters to drive the appeal said:

"We want to take this opportunity to share a heartfelt thank you to all who contributed to the mission so far. From the encouraging letters from residents to the dedicated volunteers who generously shared their time to help campaign to restore the building, your support has been invaluable. We wouldn't have achieved this milestone without each one of you."

Dan Norris, Metro Mayor who recently visited Jacobs Wells for a behind-the-scenes tour said:

“Jacobs Wells Baths is full of potential, and I know many local people are really behind getting this building restored and opened again for the benefit of the community. I’m delighted that the hard work of Trinity Community Arts has paid off to secure this cash.

"As I’ve seen when I looked around, there’s a lot to do to before Hotwells residents can enjoy this facility again, but the potential is amazing. This is another important step on the journey.”

“Each step in this journey paves the way for the next and this latest grant from DLUHC brings us ever closer to building's revival. Its success is still very much dependent on your support - we invite you to join us and show you care by giving to our Fundsurfer". Emma Harvey, CEO

Councillor Craig Cheney, Deputy Mayor for Finance, Governance, Performance, and Culture, Bristol City Council said of the news:

“It was brilliant to see the new artwork at Jacobs Wells Baths last month, after we awarded a 35-year Community Asset Transfer lease in July to bring the Grade II listed site back to life.

"Congratulations to everyone at Trinity for securing this major £1 million investment in Jacobs Wells Baths. We hope that it will be a giant leap on the journey to delivering a thriving community arts hub.”

Our CEO Emma Harvey said:

“The success of a project like this is less about one thing and more about overcoming a series of interconnected challenges - from addressing immediate liabilities and securing funding to galvanising support from local stakeholders, alongside showing that the building has a long-term, viable future.

“Each step in this journey paves the way for the next and this latest grant from DLUHC brings us ever closer to building's revival. Its success is still very much dependent on your support - we invite you to join us and show you care by giving to our Fundsurfer".

Read more about the Community Ownership Fund here.

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Thanks For Your Support

by <object object at 0x7f01454ee580> last modified 14/12/2023 04:05 PM
How your support has helped us in 2023

Thanks For Your Support

by <object object at 0x7f01454ee580> last modified 14/12/2023 04:05 PM

Garden Party: Voyages - Image Credit: Alastair Brookes

Thank you to everyone who has donated to Trinity and supported the work we do - your support throughout 2023 has enabled us to uphold our values to respond, amplify, and empower communities through arts and culture.

This year, with your support, we have taken the first steps to shape a new future for Jacobs Wells Baths, the Grade II former dance centre in Hotwells, in which we are driving a collective vision to restore and reopen the space for this and future generations.

As part of our children and young peoples programme we created pathways for some of the youngest members of the community to take part in creative provision, through free-to-access sessions for children such as Carnival Dance workshops with Movema, summer garden sessions, and music-making workshops for ages 16-25.

With the support of the Heritage Lottery Fund we uncovered 100 years of radicalism in Bristol, creating an interactive timeline and publishing a book about Bristol’s history of activism, through oral testimonies and first-hand accounts from people who were part of, and shaped by, protest movements in Bristol. These testimonies are part of our online archive.

We programmed a diverse range of arts and music as part of our in-house programme ‘Trinity Presents’, offering a platform for local up-and-coming artists and collectives such as RepresentAsian, as well as putting on shows with legendary artists such as Donae’o. We welcomed over 3000 people to our free community Garden Parties over the summer, programming a range of activities with the community in mind, as well as platforming a number of incredible local artists, bands and DJs.

In collaboration with Tamasha Theatre Company and Coney we created an interactive theatre piece ‘Duppy Hunter'. The piece was inspired by the stories shared by residents of St Paul’s during workshops within the community, in which participants reminisced over the old shops, nightlife, community movements and music which filled their younger years, which informed the narrative of Duppy Hunter.

As part of our Communities and Neighbourhoods programme we have been collaborating with organisations and the neighbourhood surrounding Trinity to celebrate and build the social connections within our locality. We linked with Onion Collective to create a digital map of unseen community connections, we supported communities who may be traditionally underrepresented to host community led events, from a regular Equality Dance event to a disco for the over 55’s to a celebration of Caribbean and Black British Culture in Festus Market and Party.

We're really excited for 2024, where we'll continue using the arts to celebrate and connect with local communities. We hope you can join us too!

Thanks for your support this year – we couldn’t do it without you.

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Look back: Duppy Hunter

by sarah last modified 14/12/2023 12:25 PM
A look back at our immersive performance exploring St Pauls

Look back: Duppy Hunter

by sarah last modified 14/12/2023 12:25 PM

Duppy Hunter. Photo Credit: Sophia Stefelle

Over the summer, we teamed up with Tamasha Theatre Company and BAFTA award-winning game designers Coney to develop and deliver ‘Duppy Hunter’, an interactive theatre piece where audiences are invited to embark on a playful exploration of St. Paul's, assuming the role of Duppy Hunters in pursuit of an elusive spirit hidden amongst the streets and sights of this vibrant neighbourhood.

"A great way to hear about local history while walking around" Feedback, Audience Member

Duppy Hunter was created as part of the third instalment of ENDS & TALES, a series of immersive smartphone adventures. Previous adventures have included uncovering the untold stories of the Bangladeshi community in London’s Brick Lane and Chinese community in Liverpool’s Chinatown.

Bubbling with magical realism, audiences were invited to help fictional character, Josie (played by Nadia Williams - I’m Not Running (2019), Broadchurch (2013)), track down a duppy that has become loose in St Paul's. Josie is from a line of obeah women priestesses that have fulfilled the role of duppy hunters, who hunt for duppies that are trying to capture human souls to walk the earth and leave a host open to future possessions. Through helping Josie to solve the riddles the duppy leaves on its trail, the adventure will take audiences past Stapleton Road and Pennywell Road and crossing the Danny, before heading onto to St Paul's. Promising to conjure up nostalgia and a Bristol of yore, audiences will be immersed in stories unfolding through their headphones.

The performance was inspired by the stories share by residents of St Paul’s during workshops within the community that were delivered in partnership with 'Malcolm X Elders' community group. In the workshops participants reminisced over the old shops, nightlife, community movements and music which filled their younger years.

During one workshop one attendees reflected that they were really happy that to be able to share their histories of coming to Bristol from the Caribbean in the 1960's and 70's. Reflecting that this brought back memories of their younger days attending night clubs such as the famed 'Bamboo Club' , and the underground 'Shabene/Shubs' parties in the 70's. They also remembered going coming to the Trinity Centre in the 70's when it was an African Caribbean Community Centre

Writer Duppy Hunter Dr Edson Burton and Director Hannah Adu-Boateng then created a performance that mixed a walking tour, promenade theatre, and gaming elements to create an adventure and touching intergenerational story.

In total 71 downloaded Duppy Hunter and 20 took part in the community workshops. The performance is available as a free download for anyone to experience. Click here to download now.

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In Conversation: Norma Daykin

by <object object at 0x7f01454ee580> last modified 13/12/2023 04:53 PM
Find out more about the regular Bristol Equality Dance sessions

In Conversation: Norma Daykin

by <object object at 0x7f01454ee580> last modified 13/12/2023 04:53 PM

Bristol Equality Dance. Credit: Norma Daykin

Ahead of Bristol Equality Winter Tea Dance at Trinity on 07 Jan, we caught up with Norma Daykin to find out more about Bristol Equality Dance, a series of regular dance classes and dance socials, welcoming LGBTA+ and same-sex dancers, their friends and supporters.

Hi Norma! Please introduce yourself and tell us a little about your background and how you got into dance.

I've been dancing since I was a child. Both my parents were active in the local scene, my Dad as a musician and my Mum as a dance teacher. Although I've always enjoyed dancing, as I got older, I became frustrated with some aspects of the mainstream dance culture. For example, I was aware that the language used by some teachers was very gendered, assuming fixed roles for men and women, and that even though it was a common sight to see two women dancing together, male couples were discouraged in mainstream classes and social events.

Can you tell us about Bristol Equality Dance and how it came about?

I started attending equality dance events in London and other European cities where the atmosphere is very different. At these events, dancers aren't expected to adopt fixed roles as leader or follower, and people don't tend to stick with the same partner during classes or social dances, which creates an inclusive and sociable and environment where everyone is accepted. I've always reflected this in my own classes in Bristol, where I've been teaching salsa, latin and ballroom for almost 20 years. Attitudes have become more accepting following the inclusion of same sex couples in Strictly, but I felt that there needed to be a more visible LGBTQ+ led dance and social project in Bristol. We are affiliated with the UK Equality Dance Council, which advocates across a range of activities for LGBTQ+ dancers, from classes and social dances through to competitions, and seeks to educate and encourage mainstream teachers, promoters and clubs to make sure that same gender and LGBTQ+ dancers are welcome everywhere.

How did you relationship with Trinity come about?

I've taught Latin and ballroom classes at Trinity for about 15 years, leading Gentle Dance classes for over 55s every Monday and also providing intergenerational social dances in collaboration with LGBT Bristol. I love the ethos of Trinity and their commitment to community arts, and the space itself is great for dancing, with two wonderful floors and atmospheric spaces. I'm delighted to be able to host our Equality Tea Dance there.

Tell us about receiving a community award UK Equality Dance Council award in 2022

The award was for services to the same sex/equality dance community, and it was given in recognition of the work I'd been doing in Bristol over the last 15 years, starting with a small group of dance students who wanted an alternative approach. I continued during the pandemic, hosting weekly zooms for LGBTQ+ dancers so they could stay in touch, enjoying music and practicing steps and technique at home. It really helped to keep the idea of dancing alive in people's minds and to maintain social bonds and friendships even though we weren't able to meet on person. Once we were able to meet up outside, I held a regular line dancing class on the Downs and people came in all weathers to meet up, see familiar and new faces, and enjoy a bit of exercise. From this foundation, classes have grown, and we now offer regular classes for beginners and improvers as well as social dances, performances and visits to equality dance friends in surrounding areas including Wales and London.

What can people expect from Bristol Equality Winter Tea Dance on 07 Jan?

This is our second such event following our summer dance which was attended by people from all over the UK. Our DJ will again be Jacky Logan, who has led dance events for many years with her Jacky's Jukebox project, and who was awarded a British Empire Medal for her services to same sex/equality dancing. The event will start at 1pm with a warm-up class, suitable for people with all levels of dance experience. There will be non-stop dancing throughout the afternoon with a wide range of dances, from traditional ballroom and latin through to salsa, Argentine Tango, Lindy Hop and West Coast Swing and some popular line dances. There will be people on hand to show less experienced dancers the steps. Most importantly, people can expect fun and a warm, friendly atmosphere, and, of course, tea and cake!

Do you have any other plans for Bristol Equality Dance that you’d like to share?

This event is part of a dance weekend we are hosting. On Saturday 6th January we'll be offering an introduction to Swing Dance with a Balboa Swing class, and a chance to dance other swing styles. This event is a charity fundraiser, in collaboration with the LARA (Lorraine Ayensu Refugee Arts) project, which supports refugees and asylum seekers in Bristol using music and arts. The event is at the ElmGrove Centre in Redland. Following that we'll be offering regular classes and socials, and we'll be back at Trinity for our Summer Tea Dance on 2nd June 2024. You can find out more details about all these events on our website.

 

If you'd like to get involved with Bristol Equality Winter Tea Dance on 07 Jan, click here to find out more.

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Opinion: Bristol Arts Funding

by <object object at 0x7f01454ee580> last modified 13/12/2023 04:34 PM
Our CEO has written an opinion piece on the challenges facing Bristol arts in the context of the wider cuts to arts funding and the impact this has on limiting pathways into careers in the creative industries

Opinion: Bristol Arts Funding

by <object object at 0x7f01454ee580> last modified 13/12/2023 04:34 PM
Opinion: Bristol Arts Funding

After school club at Trinity

Tide and Tales

Tide and Tales perform during Summer Stay and Play sessions. Photo credit: Alistair Brookes

Trinity CEO, Emma Harvey, reflects on the challenges facing Bristol arts in the context of the wider cuts to arts funding and the impact this has on limiting pathways into careers in the creative industries.

In December 2023, Bristol City Council (BCC) announced their decisions for the Cultural Investment Programme, awarding grants in principle to 15 organisations. This included Trinity, newly funded Unique Voice, and Travelling Light Theatre Company who recently lost their regular funding from Arts Council England. Also Acta, ASLS, Asian Arts Agency, Bristol Pride, Circomedia, CYN, KWMC, Paraorchestra, Rising Arts Agency, Spike Island, St Paul’s Carnival and the Tobacco Factory.

With nearly a 40% reduction in total funds compared to past rounds, 13 groups missed out on regular investment. This included previously funded groups Bristol Old Vic, Encounters, Exchange, IBT, MAYK, RWA, Saffron, St Georges, Trigger and Watershed, alongside new proposals from APE, SSGB and Wardrobe Theatre.

"Rather than sharpening our elbows to fight for the crumbs that fall from the table we should be Oliver Twisting it up and asking for more."

As testament to the sector’s precariousness, two long-standing arts organisations were listed as, “closed or closing so not considered for investment”. Those not selected have responded with concerns about the continued cost of living crisis reducing audience revenue alongside rising overheads placing pressures on finances. Cultural institutions traditionally seen as too big to fail are facing an uncertain future and all funding is still subject to annual approval. This continued uncertainty means we're all on a sinking ship, just at different points of an inescapable decline.

Successes and setbacks are all part of business as usual at Trinity. After almost 20 years the best I can say when someone asks if we'll be here in twelve months is, "hopefully". In the voluntary sector, survival is as good as it gets. Hearing frequent ‘Nos' then trying to work out what's next is part of the job. Competitive funding rounds linked to political cycles are perhaps the worst at breeding a "them and us" mindset, making organisations old and new, big and small go up against one another for ever decreasing funds. It creates a short-term focus and leads to over-commitment, particularly from those smaller, newer groups desperate to move from being “out” to “in” any funding portfolio round. It leads to an unrealistic emphasis on measuring the intangible that benefits no one and decreases our appetite for risk, stifling the very creativity we’re seeking to support.

Rather than sharpening our elbows to fight for the crumbs that fall from the table we should be Oliver Twisting it up and asking for more. Were BCC to fund all 30 organisations listed to the maximum annual grant amount of £30k per year, this would amount to the amount to less 2% of the city’s total annual revenue spend. With many administrations nationally issuing or on the verge of section 114 notices due to difficulties in delivering balanced budgets, this can make such a case for arts funding appear entitled and out of touch with the everyday suffering of many across the country. But cuts to arts funding are part of a wider narrative (see links, below) of reduced investment in the arts that deprives those without the means from carving out meaningful experiences and careers in the creative industries.

Arts can be an easy thing to cut in difficult times but we’re doing so to the detriment of those who benefit from its power most. There is an intrinsic value that’s accepted and widely evidenced. Art is good for us; our economy, our health, our sense of place and belonging. And yet, one of the wealthiest city's in one of the wealthiest countries globally can’t even resource the creativity that sits at the heart of our local identity.

Collaborating with three local primary schools, Trinity recognises the significance of early engagement with culture in igniting creative aspirations. Children locally and nationally have witnessed reduced access to arts education compounded by challenges stemming from the pandemic and the ongoing burden of cost of living limiting access to out of school activities.

The ongoing decline in arts investment nationwide results in a gradual erosion of our opportunities to engage with the arts, limiting our cultural pathways. As the voices shaping our shared narratives become fewer, the story of our national identity risks being conveyed through an ever narrowing lens. Over time, this reduces the chances for individuals without existing wealth and means to pursue meaningful careers in an industry that contributes billions to the UK's economy annually.

It is commendable that, for the time being at least, BCC have sought to protect what remains of their public subsidy for the sector and focus what resource it can with the aim of sustaining participatory arts provision within neighbourhoods. But if we really want to ensure everyone has the opportunity to access and make art we need to think of better ways to ensure the investment is felt beyond a handful of suspects, however usual or unusual.

Some of the most successful schemes to support arts and diversify the arts sector have come from creative co-option of back-to-work schemes, from Future Jobs Fund and the recent Kickstart Scheme, providing paid entry level roles for <25s, to Thatcher’s Enterprise Allowance, which enabled some of the UK’s most prolific cultural practitioners to carve out their early careers and saw the birth of Brit Art movement.

Some trusts and foundations are catching on and supporting organisations and creatives in new and flexible ways. As far as public subsidy goes, we’re fighting for a seat at a table where chairs are continually being taken out of the game. Who will secure the chair once the music stops? A more impactful path involves collaborative efforts to lay the foundations for fairer resource distribution. Let’s stop playing someone else’s game and tip the table over.

By Emma Harvey, CEO

Further reading:

Bristol City Council defends cultural venue funding cuts (BBC)

Restore Bristol arts funding! (Equity)

The arts are in crisis (Gal Dem)

Government urged to intervene over local arts cuts (Campaign For The Arts)

Funding cuts and weak economy send UK’s visual arts into crisis (The Art Newspaper)

How will art funding cuts in schools affect creativity? (It’s Nice That)

Huge decline of working class people in the arts reflects fall in wider society (Guardian)

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Hype Dance Lockdown Challenge

by sarah last modified 29/11/2023 04:26 PM
Hype Dance keeping creative during lockdown

Hype Dance Lockdown Challenge

by sarah last modified 29/11/2023 04:26 PM
Hype Dance Lockdown Challenge

Hype Dance performing during Bristol Harbour Festival

Trinity's resident Hip hop and urban dance troupe Hype Dance Company know how to keep themselves occupied in lockdown! #LockdownChallenge HYPE (Helping Young People Excel) Dance has been running for more than 13 years. Dancers aged 5-18 years of age come to Trinity to rehearse every Wednesday. You can find out more about HYPE and the rest of our community programme on our website 👉 here

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Local Artist backs Fundsurfer to restore much-loved Jacobs Wells

by sarah last modified 21/12/2023 02:14 PM
Local Artist creates bespoke artwork for public fundraiser

Local Artist backs Fundsurfer to restore much-loved Jacobs Wells

by sarah last modified 21/12/2023 02:14 PM

Photo Credit: Alastair Brookes

The momentum to restore Jacobs Wells Baths, Hotwells, Bristol, has seen a significant boost with the unveiling of a newly installed artwork on the front of the building as part of a Fundraiser to raise funds to repair and restore the Grade II listed former dance centre.

The artwork, a bespoke pen and ink drawing by Bristol-based artist Amy Hutchings and supported by Anna Haydock-Wilson, features words shared by members of the Hotwells community, gathered from a community consultation led by Trinity Community Arts as part of our mission to restore and reopen the building.  suppor

The artwork features as a reward for the Jacobs Wells Fundraiser that we have launched on the Bristol based Fund Surfer platform.

We are calling for Bristol residents to give what they can to help us reach a £5,000 fundraising target. These funds will help towards crucial costs as part of the current investigations and identified works.  People can donate via the Bristol based Fund Surfer platform.

“It’s great to see this exciting progress after the disappointment and uncertainty surrounding the restoration of Jacobs Wells Baths. The new artwork demonstrates how much this Grade II listed building means to the local community,...any contributions will be vital for achieving the vision of bringing the site back into use as a community arts hub, building on the 35-year Community Asset Transfer lease which we awarded back in July.”

Councillor Craig Cheney, Deputy Mayor for Finance, Governance, Performance, and Culture

Amy is not the first renowned artist to put their name to the appeal to save the building -  earlier this year esteemed actress Miriam Margolyes shared a heartfelt video outing the importance of community spaces such as Jacobs Wells Baths, and encouraging people to get involved and support the drive to safeguard the building and re-open the space once more.

Trinity, alongside local councillors, residents and Hotwells and Clifton Community Association, have been leading the project to restore the building since the news in Jan 2023 that the former dance hub was at risk of disposal by Bristol City Council.

Since then, the Council's CAT Group announced its decision to offer Trinity Community Arts, a registered charity, a 35-year CAT lease, subject to receipt of a satisfactory business plan. We also received a six-month occupational license during the transfer phase, to enable Trinity to undertake a detailed series of specialist surveys, funded by the Bristol-based Nisbet Trust and to undertake emergency works to halt any further damage to the roof due to water ingress.

We have secured further funding from the Architectural Heritage Fund, Sylvia Waddilove Foundation UK and others - aimed at matching the committed funding from the Nisbet Trust to support the development phase and investigations to understand the scope of work needed to restore and reopen Jacobs Wells Baths.

Emma Harvey, CEO Trinity leading on the Jacobs Wells Baths recovery project said; “We often stroll past boarded up buildings like this, imagining how they could be put to good use. The community have long campaigned to save this space and want to see it brought back into use for public benefit. That’s why we’re working hard to secure funds to restore this amazing space. Anyone wanting to support this transformative journey can donate via our Fundsurfer appeal to help us reach our target."

Support the Fundsurfer and grab your own Jacobs Wells artwork

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Exploring cultural confidence and its impact

by sarah last modified 15/11/2023 04:26 PM
A Conversation with Dr Astrid Breel, Professor Iain Gilchrist, Emma Harvey and Sarah Bentley

Exploring cultural confidence and its impact

by sarah last modified 15/11/2023 04:26 PM
Exploring cultural confidence and its impact

Trinity Garden Party

Movema Workshop

Dance workshop for primary aged children at Trinity. Photo credit: KoLAB Studios

Earlier this year Trinity was awarded a Tech Makers and Maintainers grant from Power to Change, which enabled us to look at ways in which we could utilise our Customer/Constituency Relationship Manager (CRM) to better collect and report upon data. The grant allowed us to take the time to think about how this work connects with our wider commitment to understanding people's cultural journeys.

Following the publication of our own ‘Cultural Confidence Scale’, we have connected with two universities to test this scale and to create the technology to collect and process the data we need to demonstrate the impact of Trinity’s work.

We caught up with Dr Astrid Breel of Bath Spa University; Professor Iain Gilchrist of Bristol University, and member of the MyWorld project team; Trinity’s Emma Harvey and Sarah Bentley to find out more about our Cultural Confidence scale and how community tech will be helping us to ‘Tell Our Story’.

Unpacking Cultural Confidence – Emma Harvey, CEO Trinity Community Arts

“Trinity’s Cultural Confidence Scale is a theory of change that has been developed in response to our desire to understand how we can better tell the story of an individual's journey in engaging with culture and creativity at Trinity. It is the idea that we (as consumers of culture) start our journey in an unfamiliar place to gradually building confidence through increased experiences, within familiar settings, and then move into unfamiliar settings, to then get to what I would say is the kind of peak of our Cultural Confidence Scale, which is what we hope to be - autonomous free cultural consumer. To go where we choose, consume what we want to choose, and that we are sufficiently aware and conscious enough and confident enough to be able to do those things.

A lot of our work, particularly around some of our children and young people's programmes or our targeted community work, is grant-funded. We are then having to measure against a separate set of outcomes or outputs, so that you can attribute some of those outcomes, for example Health, to coming and taking part in the arts. These to us are secondary measures to the actual primary measure of people coming and just having a rich, exciting cultural experience together. What value does that in and of itself have that's intrinsic, that we accept that arts and culture is good for us? There's a lot of academic reports to that degree. But for us, the question is how can we then understand that cultural journey a little bit more clearly, that may also include health and wellbeing outcomes and learning outcomes and various other outcomes.”

Testing the Cultural Confidence Scale - Dr Astrid Breel, Bath Spa University

“I am the Impact Research Fellow at Bath Spa University, and I am interested in understanding how people make meaning out of their experiences and find value in things like cultural or arts experiences.

I work in a community-led way that is in equal partnership with stakeholders and will start by thinking through together what are the different kinds of impacts and values that Trinity's work has? What does it mean to people? What did they get out of it? And how can we talk about that kind of stuff better, and to do this in a way that is not reductive - as it can be if we used metrics and value systems that already exist.

Within Trinity’s Cultural Confidence Scale we will be thinking with the community to see how they see themselves within the Scale. We will be exploring ways in which we can ask people good questions, in order for them to be able to share part of their reflection on their experiences with us so that we can better understand their journeys and how they find value in their journeys at Trinity.

The other element of that is thinking through the kind of more practical impact and evaluation strategies that exist at Trinity so that we can basically tell better stories in a way that is both rigorous because it's based on people's experiences, but more complex and nuanced than potentially some of the existing evaluation methods that currently exist and that are off the shelf”

Neuropsychology: How culture impacts our mental lives – Professor Iain Gilchrist, Bristol University

“I'm Professor of Neuropsychology at the University of Bristol. Neuropsychology is the a scientific endeavour to understand our mental lives. Understanding our mental lives is embedded in the actual function of the brain. We want to understand how your brain leads you to have the experiences you have - and that includes really complex experiences like cultural experiences, like going to an event at Trinity or being engaged in Trinity in some way or other, to understand what that does to our mental lives and also indirectly what that does to our minds and brains.

What is interesting about this project is that Trinity itself has the Cultural Confidence Scale – a well-worked out and quite sophisticated framework for understanding people's cultural journeys. Trinity also has this amazing data that you collect anyway, and an opportunity and an openness to collecting more data in a richer way in a more interconnected way. I'm really interested in being part of that discussion with all the stakeholders broadly – as I think there is  a real opportunity,  in the long term to open the possibility of helping people understand their cultural journey;  help Trinity to map those  journeys; and help Trinity and other stakeholders support individuals and groups of individuals who may not know where the culture journey goes next.”

Connecting the dots: creating tech that works for organisations, not organisations that work for tech- Sarah Bentley, Communications and Development Manager, Trinity Community Arts

“As an organisation, we have utilised ‘Community Tech’ - that is technology that is community driven or community-led–not off-the-shelf software or subscription models.

We have always been interested in having tech that is driven by our organisational needs - that can be developed in a way that responds to what we need. We started this year with a grant for Power to Change to maintain our Open-Source CRM. Our CRM, is based on CiviCRM, a web-based suite of internationalised open-source software for constituency relationship management that falls under the broad rubric of customer relationship management. To undertake work to help us maximise the system's ability to both gather and report upon data. We have ended the year being able to connect the dots between our Cultural Confidence Scale and the software we use to gather data in a way that is both meaningful and responsive to – not just what we need but other grassroots organisations and smaller charities – all of which, like us, have to process data for various stakeholders.

This processing of data, both in its collection and end reporting, is time-consuming. We live in a data-driven world, and we feel that if we can add value to the data through our Scale and also create affordable tools for people to collect this data, we are adding value not just our work but to the wider cultural sector.”

Our journey continues to evolve, and we will keep updating our findings via blogs and social media.  Read our blogs so far:

Power to Change

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Reflections on a year of 'Open Working'

by sarah last modified 13/11/2023 02:41 PM
How a Maker and Maintainers grant from Power to Change enabled us to drive community tech solutions

Reflections on a year of 'Open Working'

by sarah last modified 13/11/2023 02:41 PM

Trinity's Annual AGM, one of the many events in which we share data with stakeholders

At the start of 2023, Trinity  was awarded a Maker and Maintainers grant from Power to Change, which kicked started a transformative journey in our open-source development.


"For me Community Tech is all about tech that is led by our organisation as opposed to tech that leads our organisation" Sarah Bentley

This blog post, by Development and Communications Manager, Sarah Bentley, reflects on the lessons learnt and the evolution of our approach to Community Tech and Free and Open Source Software (FOSS).

Vision for Community Tech and FOSS: Our vision was to use FOSS to enable efficient data management and reporting. We collect data across a wide-range systems and platforms, from ticket updates to promoter reports, audience numbers for annual reports, to impact statistics. Our goal was not only to streamline our own processes but also to create accessible tech solutions for grassroots and smaller organisations.

Open Working and Transparency: As part of the grant, I participated in an Open Working course, this emphasised the importance of transparency in our steps and work. This approach complemented our existing Working Group model and allowed us to communicate our vision for Community Tech and FOSS both internally and externally.

Time for Reflection: The grant provided a valuable opportunity for introspection. In my multifaceted role, which I describe as 'money in and stories out,' I rarely have the chance to consider the bigger picture. As a Maker and Maintainer, I delved into how Community Tech and our Tech Makers project aligned with our broader initiatives, specifically how we can communicate why we choose FOSS over over 'off-the-shelf systems' or platforms like Google Forms.

Engagement with FOSS Community: Dedicated time with the FOSS community revealed that our efforts with CIVICRM hadn't gone unnoticed. People shared our interest in building solutions through CIVI, leading us to support a research project within CIVI on real-time data reporting. Engagements included community meet-ups, connections with charity/grassroots communities, and presentations at institutions like Bristol University.

Democratising Data: In my role as the data processor and visualiser, I realised the significance of empowering communities with data ownership. Sharing our processes resonated with others contemplating similar approaches. The focus shifted towards making data more democratic, placing power in the hands of the people rather than businesses' with differing values.

Our tech journey continues to evolve and we will keep updating our findings via blogs and social media.  Read more about how we are engaging in community tech solutions:

Power to Change

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Nature Play

by sarah last modified 02/11/2023 04:30 PM
Free after school sessions for primary aged children

Nature Play

by sarah last modified 02/11/2023 04:30 PM

nature Play KoLAB Studios

Nature Play Sessions. Photo credit: Alastair Brookes, KoLAB Studio

As part of our children and young people's programme we are providing free after school provision for children who attend local primary schools. Children who attend are aged 8yrs-11yrs and many have limited access to any green space at home. In our first term 22 children have taken part.

‘I loved it, every bit of it.’ Feedback, Nature Play

The sessions are facilitated by our Nature Play team which include qualified Forest School teachers and playworkers. During the sessions children connect with nature and share their ideas to help shape activities. Each week when the children come they start the sessions climbing one of our apple trees to collect an apple! Other activities include painting pumpkins, digging and planting, identifying animals and listening in nature.

Children also have the opportunity to learn more about the natural world, from learning about seasons, to understanding sustainability. They also learn more about the community they live in. Nature Play enables  children to meet together and to create and form relationships with peers, outside of school.

If you are a parent/carer of a primary aged child (8yrs-11yrs) who would like to attend Nature Play click here to find out more and sign up.

Nature Play is held on Monday's during term time and is made possible due to funding from Quartet Community Foundation, WESport and Bristol City Council.

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Understory: Mapping Social Connectiveness

by sarah last modified 02/11/2023 01:14 PM
Onion Collective hosted a free workshop at Trinity to map community connections

Understory: Mapping Social Connectiveness

by sarah last modified 02/11/2023 01:14 PM
Understory: Mapping Social Connectiveness

Understory Alastair Brookes

Understory Alastair Brookes

Understory Workshop. Photo credit: Alastair Brookes/KoLAB Studios

In Oct 2023 we collaborated with Onion Collective to deliver 'Understory' - an interactive workshop in which participants collectively create a digital map of social connections within the local community. The workshop, which took around 1.5hrs, was hosted by Georgie from Onion Collective.

We invited a wide range of local cross-sector organisations to participate in the workshop. Organisations represented ranged from those who are known to us to many had not connected to Trinity but are working within the local community. These included statutory services, Grassroots and DIY networks as well as community activists who are working in areas including health, activism, human rights and education.

During the workshop, the group answered a series of questions that created, in real-time, an interactive map projected throughout the session. The map, accessible to organisations who have taken part in the workshop will be an invaluable tool to help inform our plans as we go forward, and for all the other organisations who participated too.

Following the session, we hosted an informal networking opportunity which allowed people, many of whom had not connected with each other before, to meet and connect. In total, 63 people took part representing 38 organisations.

We will be hosting a follow-up for anyone who came along and people who were named on the map (and did not attend) so they can add to and build up the network.

This workshop is part of our wider commitment to working with our local community to create a relevant and responsive cultural offer. You can find out more about this vision here.

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Restoration Levy

by sarah last modified 18/10/2023 01:49 PM
Introducing a small charge to help repair, maintain and restore Trinity, a Grade II* listed building

Restoration Levy

by sarah last modified 18/10/2023 01:49 PM
Restoration Levy

The Trinity Centre 2023

Kabaka Pyramid 2023. Photo credit: Khali Ackford

We are introducing a £1 Restoration Levy on every event ticket sold. This income will be used to create a dedicated fund for critical building works that will protect and maintain the Trinity Centre, a Grade II* Listed building and the grounds.

In Sept 2023, Music Venue Trust announced the UK is set to lose 10% of its independent venues by the end of the year. Like many grassroots music venues and arts centres across the country, Trinity faces unprecedented challenges due to the cost-of-living crisis, rising overheads and ongoing upkeep as a Grade II* Listed converted former-church.

The Trinity Centre is a space for a diverse multidisciplinary arts programme for over 73,000 people every year. Since the building has been in our guardianship, we have raised and spent over £3m in its restoration, to improve accessibility, maintain and enhance this vital community asset and invest in green energy solutions to reduce our carbon footprint.

As a registered charity, this Restoration Levy will be treated as a restricted heritage fund that will be dedicated to fulfilling our charitable mission, to preserve, protect and improve for the public benefit the Trinity Centre, formerly the Holy Trinity Church, and promote the heritage of this building.

Our aim is to continue to provide a vibrant hub where today’s and tomorrow's generations can find joy in unforgettable concerts, electrifying club nights, community gatherings and immersive, impactful experiences. Your support through the Restoration Levy will help us to continue this legacy, helping us to raise over £40,000 each year, to:

Maintain and improve the Centre: In a typical year, we spend over £100,000 on maintenance, repairs and facilities management and our 2022 conservation survey estimates over £400,000 additional repair works will need to be delivered over the next decade. This Levy will help us to ensure our doors can remain open now and for future generations.

Improve accessibility: As a locally rooted community arts centre, we are committed to ensuring our activities are accessible. These efforts have been recognised by the Attiute is Everything Bronze Award and we continue to strive to remove barriers to taking part to ensure everyone has access to great arts and cultural experiences.

Enhance sustainability: We have installed solar panels and LED lighting to reduce running costs and carbon emissions and will continue to work to improve the efficiency of the building and ensure that our programme for the people comes not at the expense of the planet.

Thank you for being part of the journey.

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Well-being Events

by sarah last modified 10/10/2023 11:43 AM
This World Mental Health Day we are shining a light on activities tailored to improve well being

Well-being Events

by sarah last modified 10/10/2023 11:43 AM
Well-being Events

Street painting in Newtown

Gerry's Attic Garden Party

Gerry's Attic - Image Credit: Alastair Brookes

This World Mental Health Day, we are shining a light on some of the activities at Trinity that are specifically programmed to offer support and help improve mental wellbeing.

Next Gen Sounds

Our weekly, drop-in music sessions for young people, Next-Gen Sounds, serves as both a place for young people to collaborate on their musical projects in Trinity’s music studio, but also acts as a safe space for young people to seek support and engage with musicians as a way of improving mental wellbeing. Supported by Bristol-based Mental Health charity ‘Off The Record’, Next-Gen Sounds has played a vital role in supporting young musicians – many of whom are from challenging circumstances – by harnessing the transformative potential of creativity to enhance their mental and emotional resilience.

Community Volunteer Gardening

Trinity's fortnightly Community Volunteer Gardening sessions are relaxed, informal, practical gardening sessions to support the Trinity Community Garden's maintenance and upkeep. Gardening is known to have a profoundly positive impact on mental health and wellbeing. The act of nurturing plants and witnessing their growth fosters a sense of purpose and accomplishment. Gardening encourages mindfulness, reducing stress and anxiety while promoting relaxation. Trinity's Community Volunteer Gardening sessions are very important to people living in the local area, many of whom live in high-rise flats and therefore may not have access to green space of their own, and without Trinity's Community Garden may not gain the positive effects that gardening has on improving mental health and wellbeing.

FAB Disco

FAB Disco is a disco for anyone over the age of 50, delivered in partnership Friends Ageing Better (FAB) and Eastside Community Trust. Isolation and loneliness are all too common among older people, and FAB Disco offers a space for people to socialise, listen to music, and dance together, all of which are proven to have a positive impact on mental health. Music can significantly enhance the mental health of older people by offering emotional support, triggering positive memories, and promoting relaxation. It fosters social connections, reduces stress, and provides an avenue for self-expression, contributing to improved emotional well-being, cognitive function, and overall quality of life.

Creative Wellbeing Workshops

At Trinity, we run Creative Wellbeing Workshops in collaboration with Age UK and Alive Activities. These workshops are a safe and welcoming space for people to take part in arts and crafts activities and to learn more about ways to look after themselves and relax. The sessions are aimed at bringing together individuals from different cultures within the community to explore and share their emotions in a creative and fun way. Using different art materials to express emotion acts as a valuable means of expressing and connecting with emotions, and engaging in this process in the company of other people from the local community can provide the opportunity to increase our understanding of and empathy for each other

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Opinion: The preservation paradox: sell now, pay later

by sarah last modified 10/10/2023 04:26 PM
CEO Emma Harvey reflects on the growing trend to sell off publicly owned assets

Opinion: The preservation paradox: sell now, pay later

by sarah last modified 10/10/2023 04:26 PM

Safeguard our assets

Image credit: Visual Thinkery

This issue of our built environment and who shapes it is a local affair. Aside from exceptions such as the nefarious demolition of The Crooked House pub, campaigns rarely make national news. Headlines of collapsing schools, public sector strikes and unrelenting cost of living and housing crises can make preservation of our heritage and civic realm appear out of touch and NIMBYist.

"Amidst the minefield of regulations, funding shortfalls, and bureaucratic complexities, the neglect of our shared spaces carries profound implications for generations to come. We must move beyond a meritocracy model and the need to balance our short-term fiscal needs to take a duty of care over the long-term reimagining of a shared civic canvas on which to build our collective future."  Emma Harvey

Context is a cornerstone principle of the national planning framework, yet local authorities find the threat of an overturned decision and the resulting fines too risky at a time when 26 English councils risk of bankruptcy in the next two years [^1^]. Councils have powers to issue enforcement notices for urgent preservation or compulsory purchase of important, privately owned buildings. All too often though, it’s these same councils who are the reluctant custodians of our ageing social infrastructure.

We find ourselves trapped in an ongoing “estates rationalisation” exercise that deprives future generations of the shared spaces that shape the collective narratives of our communities. Research from the IPPR shows £15bn of publicly owned assets have been sold off since 2010. That’s 75,000 civic spaces, libraries, leisure centres, community halls and youth spaces lost. There is funding available to save them; £300 million DCMS Youth Investment Fund and £150 million DLUHC Community Ownership Fund. And yet it would appear only a fraction of these central government funds have been allocated.

These old, often listed, almost always complex buildings are in desperate need of investment after decades of cuts that have de-prioritised preventative preservation. This leaves such projects to save these spaces with an inherent messiness that is just to risky amidst continued rising costs of essential services. Such conditions make it almost impossible for all but a few fortuitous groups to lever funds to save the spaces we love.

While new laws have appeared to protect statues in the wake of the Colston statue's toppling, this protection seems to favour a type of politicised heritage storytelling, rather than building connections through our shared past. Our heritage spaces are being co-opted by those looking to control the narrative as exemplified by the recent case of the Restore Trust's bid to dominate the governance within the National Trust [^2^]. If those who control the present control the past and that past shapes our future, then the erosion of our stake and influence in shaping these narratives poses significant threat, especially if we continue to lose the spaces that allow us to make these stories our own.

The idea that we can only fix the roof whilst the sun is shining risks leaving us with no roofs at all under which to learn how to swim, to dance, to read, to make memories, connections and shared solutions to the problems facing us all. After a decade plus of political storms the ability to define heritage, own space and determine which assets should be preserved feels like a luxury. Distracted with the immediacy of our collective woes, the agendas of all but a few will define who we become.

Amidst the minefield of regulations, funding shortfalls, and bureaucratic complexities, the neglect of our shared spaces carries profound implications for generations to come. We must move beyond a meritocracy model and the need to balance our short-term fiscal needs to take a duty of care over the long-term reimagining of a shared civic canvas on which to build our collective future. Cost-saving solutions that fail to think beyond the current political cycle means we pay in perpetuity. Somewhere, in some form, we always pay.

Emma Harvey, CEO

About this article

Trinity are committed to advocating for shared community and cultural spaces. We are members of Locality and are currently leading an appeal to restore Jacobs Wells Baths in Hotwells.

Read our 100 Beacons report that shines a light on the importance of – and understand the risks posed to – Bristol's community and cultural assets.

[^1^]: The Guardian: "At least 26 English councils at risk of bankruptcy in next two years"

[^2^]: The Guardian: “Vote no to the thinktank pod people trying to body-snatch the National Trust

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In Conversation: Hanna Adu-Boateng

by <object object at 0x7f01454ee580> last modified 03/10/2023 01:48 PM
We caught up with Bristol based director of ‘Duppy Hunter’

In Conversation: Hanna Adu-Boateng

by <object object at 0x7f01454ee580> last modified 03/10/2023 01:48 PM

Artwork by Patch Keyes

Duppy Hunter: A Locals Guide to St Paul’s is a ‘listening experience’ where audiences are invited to embark on a playful exploration of St. Paul's, assuming the role of Duppy Hunters in pursuit of an elusive spirit hidden amongst the streets and sights of this vibrant neighbourhood.

This unique experience is a collaboration between Trinity and the renowned Tamasha Theatre Company, whose work supports both emerging & established Global Majority artists and arts organisations Coney who create playful digital experiences.

We caught up with the Director of Duppy Hunter, Hanna Adu-Boateng, to find out more about the adventure:

What attracted you to this project?

The project came about at a time when I was seeking work with Global Majority theatre companies. I was really interested in the collaboration between Tamasha, Coney and Trinity and the concept of the Ends and Tales genre of theatre. I liked the fact that the three organisations were looking for a director who was connected to the Global Majority heritages, especially the African Caribbean communities in St Paul’s, Bristol. I came to Bristol 30 years ago to work creatively within St Paul’s for an organisation called Kuumba, which empowered and developed people of African descent. Dr Edson Burton also worked there at the same time. However, an opportunity has never arisen for me to direct/dramaturg one of his plays. The project brief also aligned with my desire to delve into work which includes interviewing members of the community to draw out personal stories connected to the rich history of St Paul’s. I also was really attracted to the prospect of developing my work with digital media and audio production, which would be a new and exciting challenge for me.

Duppy Hunter is written by Dr Edson Burton, inspired by interviews with the local people of Bristol and their memories. How do you go about directing a piece of work that use community stories?

Directing Duppy Hunter means that you must be able to connect with, design a specific set of questions that you want to ask each interviewee, but also be flexible enough to go with the stories each person wants to tell. The memories of local people and their connection to St Paul’s give authenticity to the narrative, which Edson created. It is important that the writer has confidence in you honouring his work and the local people trust and are comfortable with sharing their memories with you. I think Edson drew out a strong narrative that will relate to many of the community of St Paul’s from decades gone by, but he also included poignant individual memories of characters who have passed, which must be overseen with care and empathy.

Why is a project like this important to Bristol - and beyond?

It is so important that Bristol and places beyond recognises and celebrates the epic contribution the African Caribbean people from the Windrush era onwards have shaped the political landscape, history and culture of the city. You can learn more from projects such as this.

What should someone expect to experience when they sign up for Duppy Hunter?

They should expect to have a lot of fun experiencing the narrative unfold as it transports you from one memory and place to another, through the central character of Josie, who is a Duppy Hunter. They will also be moving through different periods of time, encountering different people who have contributed to the racial justice and equality struggle.They will enjoy music from different decades, the singing of hymns and be moved by real people who have passed but will never be forgotten. They will learn alot!

 

Duppy Hunter runs from 03 October - 29 October and starts at The Trinity Centre - click here to get your tickets.

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Vital funds for Jacobs Wells secured

by sarah last modified 29/09/2023 08:59 AM
Architectural Heritage Fund and Sylvia Waddilove Foundation UK support our mission to restore the building

Vital funds for Jacobs Wells secured

by sarah last modified 29/09/2023 08:59 AM

Jacobs Wells Baths, a dance centre for over 30yrs, has been closed for a number of years

The mission to restore Jacobs Wells has received a significant boost with grants from the Architectural Heritage Fund and the Sylvia Waddilove Foundation UK, aimed at matching the committed funding from the Nisbet Trust. This financial support is a crucial step towards reimagining and restoring the iconic Grade II Listed building in Hotwells.

The redevelopment project is being supported by specialist expertise from an experienced professional team including conservation-accredited architect, Corinne Fitzpatrick. Corinne has previously worked on projects including Clevedon Pool, Bridgewater Castle House, St. James Priory, and Tabernacle Kingswood, as well as supporting with a year long repair programme of works to the Trinity Centre.

Leading the design aspect of the project is Sean Redmond and the PH3 Design team who have a history of involvement in feasibility studies and capital design scheme’s for the former Bristol Community Dance Centre, based at Jacobs Wells for over 30 years until they closed in 2016.

The structural engineering team from Mann Williams have been working on a similar restoration scheme to Moseley Road Baths. The team are being led by Nichola Dyer of Greenwood Projects, who are also providing Quantity Surveying services.

The team have commenced on-site surveys to assess the condition of the asset. These surveys will help identify costed works plans, which will include a phase of Emergency Works to stabilise the asset while the Trinity Team and the steering group work on developing an application to the Community Ownership Fund (11 October).

As part of our mission to restore the building we will be continuing to approach heritage funders to support Emergency Works alongside developing a full application to Community Ownership Fund – a £150m government scheme to save assets and amenities at risk of being lost.

Be part of future and help make the magic happen:

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Autumn Theatre and Arts Programme 2023

by <object object at 0x7f01454ee580> last modified 16/10/2023 01:08 PM
Find out more about theatre and film screenings at Trinity this autumn

Autumn Theatre and Arts Programme 2023

by <object object at 0x7f01454ee580> last modified 16/10/2023 01:08 PM

Image: Sould and Cells

We are thrilled to announce our Autumn Theatre and Arts programme, a dynamic exploration of grassroots social justice which celebrates underrepresented voices and shares untold stories from Bristol and beyond.

“This season is an ode to the underrepresented voices and cultures that make up our social fabric, redefining and exploring contemporary arts through the lens of social justice.” Esther Afikiruweh, Combined Arts Producer, Trinity

The series features film screenings, spoken word performances, theatre and dance and kicks off with an immersive audio trail, 'Duppy Hunter: A Local's Guide to St Paul's' on 03 Oct. Audiences are invited to embark on a playful exploration of St. Paul's, assuming the role of Duppy Hunters in pursuit of an elusive spirit hidden amongst the streets and sights of this vibrant neighbourhood. This unique ‘listening experience’ is a collaboration between Trinity and the renowned Tamasha Theatre Company whose work supports both emerging & established Global Majority artists and arts organisations Coney who create playful digital experiences.

On 12 October, we welcome community artists Carlota Matos and Hiba Elhindi, who, in collaboration with the refugee and asylum seeker support charity Borderlands, will host 'Theatre of Migration'. This evening promises engaging panel discussions, screenings, and sharings, delving into the world of participatory theatre and the ethical considerations of creating theatre based on lived experiences, particularly from the perspective of refugees and asylum seekers.

The powerful documentary, 'I am Judah', will be screened on 20 October. The film tells the poignant story of Easton resident Ras Judah, who was unjustly tasered by the police in 2017. Despite a criminal trial, the officer responsible was found not guilty, and in September 2018, she was also cleared of misconduct. "I Am Judah" critically examines this case, giving voice to Judah as a community elder and shedding light on the broader issue of police injustices affecting many others.

Returning to Trinity on 05 November, dance artist Akeim Toussaint Buck and Crystal Zillwood present their performance, 'Souls and Cells'. This mesmerising showcase delves into themes of heritage, ancestry, and moments of inter-connectiveness through the medium of movement, dance, and sound.

As a culmination of the season, we join forces with the Afrika Eye film festival on 17 November for the 17th festival edition. Together, we will present a screening of 'Neptune Frost', the 2022 science fiction romantic musical film co-directed by Saul Williams and Anisia Uzeyman, alongside performances from spoken word artists.

Our Autumn Theatre and Arts programme promises to be a season of thought-provoking and inspiring events, celebrating diversity, social justice, and artistic expression. Join us as we elevate underrepresented voices and share powerful stories that resonate with the many communities who live in Bristol.

About Trinity Presents:

This is part of Trinity Presents - our in-house programme of music and performance, bringing world-class artists and emerging talent to inner-city audiences.

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